Tag Archives: diabetes

The Health Toll of Immigration

Lisa Says: Sabrina Tavernise’s NY Times article detailing how those immigrating to the US adopt poor health habits and carve years off their lives, their children’s lives.  Once again, this reveals health is fundamentally about life style not genetics.  Lifestyle drives genetic expression, for health or disease, as Dr. Ornish’s research has shown.  Enjoy the [...]

Lisa Says: Sabrina Tavernise’s NY Times article detailing how those immigrating to the US adopt poor health habits and carve years off their lives, their children’s lives.  Once again, this reveals health is fundamentally about life style not genetics.  Lifestyle drives genetic expression, for health or disease, as Dr. Ornish’s research has shown.  Enjoy the article.

The Health Toll of Immigration 

By     Published: May 18, 2013

BROWNSVILLE, Tex. — Becoming an American can be bad for your health.  

A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in this country, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. And while their American-born children may have more money, they tend to live shorter lives than the parents.

The pattern goes against any notion that moving to America improves every aspect of life. It also demonstrates that at least in terms of health, worries about assimilation for the country’s 11 million illegal immigrants are mistaken. In fact, it is happening all too quickly.

photo by J. Michael Short for The New York Times

Esther Angeles, 41, with her daughter, Johanna Marisol Gomez, 7. Ms. Angeles has developed diabetes since coming to the United States and struggles to see that her daughter eats healthfully.   Continue reading »

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A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain

Lisa Says:  Really clear article from Princeton on their research of High Fructose Corn Syrup, how it differs from other forms of sugar, and how it affects the body differently.  Enjoy.
A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain
Posted March 22, 2010; 10:00 a.m.by Hilary Parker
 
A Princeton University research [...]

Lisa Says:  Really clear article from Princeton on their research of High Fructose Corn Syrup, how it differs from other forms of sugar, and how it affects the body differently.  Enjoy.

A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain

Posted March 22, 2010; 10:00 a.m.by Hilary Parker

 

A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same. 

In addition to causing significant weight gain in lab animals, long-term consumption of high-fructose corn syrup also led to abnormal increases in body fat, especially in the abdomen, and a rise in circulating blood fats called triglycerides. The researchers say the work sheds light on the factors contributing to obesity trends in the United States.

A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain

  A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same. 

In addition to causing significant weight gain in lab animals, long-term consumption of high-fructose corn syrup also led to abnormal increases in body fat, especially in the abdomen, and a rise in circulating blood fats called triglycerides. The researchers say the work sheds light on the factors contributing to obesity trends in the United States.
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Artificial sweeteners: sugar-free, but at what cost?

Lisa Says: Comprehensive article from Harvard Medical School on multiple concerns with chemical or artifical sweeteners.  One part quite compelling was not just concern over safety, but, “daily consumption of diet drinks was associated with a 36% greater risk for metabolic syndrome and a 67% increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Aren’t these diseases that [...]

Lisa Says: Comprehensive article from Harvard Medical School on multiple concerns with chemical or artifical sweeteners.  One part quite compelling was not just concern over safety, but, “daily consumption of diet drinks was associated with a 36% greater risk for metabolic syndrome and a 67% increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Aren’t these diseases that artificial sweeteners may help prevent in the first place?”  Enjoy the article.

  Artificial sweeteners: sugar-free, but at what cost?

Posted July 16, 2012, 1:28 pm   Holly Strawbridge, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

By offering the taste of sweetness without any calories, artificial sweeteners seem like they could be one answer to effective weight loss. The average 12-ounce can of sugar-sweetened soda delivers about 150 calories, almost all of them from sugar. The same amount of diet soda—zero calories. The choice seems like a no-brainer.

The American Heart Association (AHA) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have given a cautious nod to the use of artificial sweeteners in place of sugar to combat obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, all risk factors for heart disease. (You can read the full statement here.)

“While they are not magic bullets, smart use of non-nutritive sweeteners could help you reduce added sugars in your diet, therefore lowering the number of calories you eat. Reducing calories could help you attain and maintain a healthy body weight, and thereby lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes,” said Dr. Christopher Gardner, an associate professor of medicine at Stanford University in California, in a press release accompanying the scientific statement.

As with everything, there’s more to the artificial sweetener story than their effect on weight. To learn more about them, I spoke with Dr. David Ludwig, an obesity and weight-loss specialist at Harvard-affiliated Boston Children’s Hospital. He has a keen interest in products designed to help people lose weight at keep it off. And what he has learned about artificial sweeteners worries him. 

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How stress can make us overeat

Lisa Says:  Good info from Harvard Medical School on the physiology of how stress hormones can influence our food cravings PLUS practical steps you can take to reduce the stress ergo the cravings.
How stress can make us overeat      
January 3, 2012      Harvard Medical School Newsletter      healthbeat@mail.health.harvard.edu
It’s been another hectic day. On impulse, you grab an [...]

Lisa Says:  Good info from Harvard Medical School on the physiology of how stress hormones can influence our food cravings PLUS practical steps you can take to reduce the stress ergo the cravings.

How stress can make us overeat      

January 3, 2012      Harvard Medical School Newsletter      healthbeat@mail.health.harvard.edu

It’s been another hectic day. On impulse, you grab an extra-large candy bar during your afternoon break. You plan to take just a few bites. But before you know it, you’ve polished off the whole thing — and, at least temporarily, you may feel better.

Rest assured you’re not alone. Stress, the hormones it unleashes, and the effects of high-fat, sugary “comfort foods” push people toward overeating.

Effects on appetite

In the short term, stress can shut down appetite. A structure in the brain called the hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing hormone, which suppresses appetite. The brain also sends messages to the adrenal glands atop the kidneys to pump out the hormone epinephrine (also known as adrenaline). Epinephrine helps trigger the body’s fight-or-flight response, a revved-up physiological state that temporarily puts eating on hold.

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Twinkies for breakfast?

Lisa Says:  In these days of sky rocketing childhood obesity, this data from Environmental Working Group is a review of 84 popular cereal brands have as much, if not more, sugar than Twinkies and Chips Ahoy cookies.  It pays to read your labels !  Enjoy the article.
Sugar in Children’s Cereals  by EWG.org December 2011
Popular brands [...]

Lisa Says:  In these days of sky rocketing childhood obesity, this data from Environmental Working Group is a review of 84 popular cereal brands have as much, if not more, sugar than Twinkies and Chips Ahoy cookies.  It pays to read your labels !  Enjoy the article.

Sugar in Children’s Cereals  by EWG.org December 2011

Popular brands pack more sugar than snack cakes and cookies

Parents have good reason to worry about the sugar content of children’s breakfast cereals, according to an Environmental Working Group review of 84 popular brands.

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, at nearly 56 percent sugar by weight, leads the list of high-sugar cereals, according to EWG’s analysis.

A one-cup serving of Honey Smacks packs more sugar than a Hostess Twinkie, and one cup of any of 44 other children’s cereals has more sugar than three Chips Ahoy! cookies.

Link to article

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School Lunch Programs Begin to Change Their Menus for the Better

Lisa Says: No one denies that the nation’s health continues a rapid decline, with our children at the front of the pack.  Here is a CLEAR example of how grass roots movements make a fundamental difference !  Enjoy the article.
School Lunch Programs Begin to Change Their Menus for the Better
NaturalNews.com by Cindy Jones-Shoeman, citizen journalist   [...]

Lisa Says: No one denies that the nation’s health continues a rapid decline, with our children at the front of the pack.  Here is a CLEAR example of how grass roots movements make a fundamental difference !  Enjoy the article.

School Lunch Programs Begin to Change Their Menus for the Better

NaturalNews.com by Cindy Jones-Shoeman, citizen journalist   Originally published October 5 2010

(NaturalNews) While there is plenty of room for improvement, changes across the nation in local school lunch programs can give parents hope.

It wasn’t long ago that Morgan Spurlock, in his documentary film Super Size Me, pointed out the sad state of most public school lunch programs. He found that many children weren’t getting fed nutritious meals at school; and in fact, most foods served in school cafeterias came out of boxes stored in the freezer. In addition, ubiquitous candy and soda machines merely exacerbated the problem.

Fortunately, he along with many other people seem to have “stirred the pot” enough to effect change. Many people have wanted healthier options for kids at school, and the outcry is becoming harder to ignore. One of the more notable online opinions has belonged to a woman who goes by the name of “Mrs. Q,” an anonymous teacher with a blog entitled Fed Up With Lunch: The School Lunch Project. She has vowed to eat the cafeteria food at her school for lunch for an entire year (January through December). She has been documenting the meals with honest commentary in spite of fear for her job or exposing her identity. She feels strongly that the general public needs to know what their children are being served every day at school. Jamie Oliver, with his television show and website, is leading a Food Revolution, in hopes of raising awareness about the sad state of school lunches. Continue reading »

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Antioxidants help arteries stay healthy in people at risk for heart disease

Lisa Says:  This is convincing clinical research showing the health benefits of antioxidants related to heart disease, and even diabetes, cholesterol imbalances, and high blood pressure.  The study used supplements which can also easily be found in fresh foods. The conclusion from the research posted by the National Institute of Health said, “Antioxidant supplementation significantly [...]

Lisa Says:  This is convincing clinical research showing the health benefits of antioxidants related to heart disease, and even diabetes, cholesterol imbalances, and high blood pressure.  The study used supplements which can also easily be found in fresh foods. The conclusion from the research posted by the National Institute of Health said, “Antioxidant supplementation significantly increased large and small artery elasticity in patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This beneficial vascular effect was associated with an improvement in glucose and lipid metabolism as well as decrease in blood pressure.”   I’m attaching the summary from Natural News (easier to understand!) and the link to the research is included. So get going on you’re fresh fruits, veges and such !  (HINT: the less cooked the better and best in ‘raw’ form).

 Antioxidants help arteries stay healthy in people at risk for heart diseaseThursday, July 22, 2010 by: S. L. Baker, features writer,  NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews) Antioxidants are substances that protect cells against the effects of free radicals — molecules produced when the body breaks down food or is exposed to environmental toxins and radiation. Free radicals are believed to play a role in heart disease, cancer and other disorders. So it makes sense that antioxidants could help protect or even treat many health problems. Continue reading »

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A diet loaded with antioxidant rich foods improves insulin resistance

Rex Says:  When I changed my diet and lifestyle to address my cancer naturally, fresh foods – especially antioxident rich foods – played a major part, and continue to keep my health flourishing today.  Research continues to show that diet and lifestyle can have a major impact in preventing and/or addressing chronic diseases such as [...]

Rex Says:  When I changed my diet and lifestyle to address my cancer naturally, fresh foods – especially antioxident rich foods – played a major part, and continue to keep my health flourishing today.  Research continues to show that diet and lifestyle can have a major impact in preventing and/or addressing chronic diseases such as diabetes.

 A diet loaded with antioxidant rich foods improves insulin resistanceNaturalNews.com  by S. L. Baker, features writer Originally published July 12 2010 

 NaturalNews) According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDKD), insulin resistance is a condition in which the pancreas eventually can’t keep up with the body’s demand for insulin (a hormone that helps the body use glucose for energy). Eventually, an excess of glucose builds up in the bloodstream — and that sets the stage for type 2 diabetes.

New research just presented at the Endocrine Society’s 92nd Annual Meeting, held in San Diego, shows that natural antioxidants in the diet can be a powerful way to improve insulin resistance — even in people who are obese and suffering from metabolic syndrome. A precursor of diabetes associated with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions (including high blood pressure, elevated insulin levels, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels) that raise the risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as diabetes. Continue reading »

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20 Things You Need to Know About Insulin

Lisa Says:  I got this powerful info on insulin (and diabetes) from HealthBookSummaries.com.  Diabetes is one of the most common issues dramatically affected by lifestyle.  Here’s their summary:
“These are some powerful statistics: A total of 23. 6 million children and adults in the United States (7.8 percent of the population) have diabetes, 5.7 million people are [...]

Lisa Says:  I got this powerful info on insulin (and diabetes) from HealthBookSummaries.com.  Diabetes is one of the most common issues dramatically affected by lifestyle.  Here’s their summary:

“These are some powerful statistics: A total of 23. 6 million children and adults in the United States (7.8 percent of the population) have diabetes, 5.7 million people are undiagnosed with diabetes and 57 million have pre-diabetes. What’s more startling is that 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older every year.(1)  This is a serious disease that revolves around the hormone insulin. Insulin is central to regulating the energy and glucose metabolism in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle, and fat tissue to take up glucose from the blood, storing it as glycogen in the liver and muscle.(2)  Read on to learn more about this hormone and the implications it has on this disease which has reached epidemic proportions.

1. Insulin is the hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar by taking sugar out of the blood and putting it into cells. High levels of insulin mean low levels of blood glucose.

- Michael Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D., The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods 

2. Diabetes is a metabolic problem that affects your body’s ability to make or respond to insulin, a hormone. Insulin regulates the delivery of blood glucose (blood sugar) to your body’s organs and tissues, where it’s used for energy. Type I, or insulin-dependent, diabetes, is an inherited disease that affects the pancreas, destroying that organ’s ability to make insulin. Type I diabetes usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Nine out of 10 people with diabetes have Type II, or non-insulin-dependent, diabetes. For them, the body can’t use insulin that’s manufactured.

- Prevention Magazine Health Books, The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Women: Women Doctors Reveal over 2,000 Self-Help Tips on the Health Problems That Concern Women the Most Continue reading »

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What if You Ate Only What Was Advertised on TV?

Lisa Says: It will hopefully come as no surprise that if we only ate foods that were advertised on TV, TIME magazine reports that researchers have found “that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar.”   The issue is that [...]

Lisa Says: It will hopefully come as no surprise that if we only ate foods that were advertised on TV, TIME magazine reports that researchers have found “that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar.”   The issue is that “TV ads for food may be skewing our decisions on what we eat in powerful ways.”
QUESTION: So how influenced are you by advertising and the media?  Perhaps more than you realize?  Enjoy the article.

What if You Ate Only What Was Advertised on TV?

By Alice Park Wednesday, Jun. 02, 2010, TIME magazine

It should come as no surprise that the typical American diet isn’t exactly brimming with healthy goodness — rather, it’s laden with fat, sugar and salt. And now new research published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association points to a troubling reason: TV ads for food may be skewing our decisions on what we eat in powerful ways.

To figure out exactly how unhealthy a TV-guided diet would be, researchers studied food commercials that appeared during 84 hours of prime-time programming and 12 hours of Saturday-morning cartoons broadcast over the major U.S. networks during one month in 2004. When the research team calculated the nutritional content of a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet containing only foods that were advertised on television, they found that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar. “That’s almost a month’s worth of sugar in one day,” notes study leader Michael Mink at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Ga.
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