Tag Archives: nutrition

Smart Snacks!

Lilia Smelkova, Food Day (10/24/2014) Campaign Manager, is reporting school lunches are improving! “This is due to the groundbreaking Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 which set nutrition and health standards for school food.”
Check out the new UDSA Smart Snacks guidelines too!

Lilia Smelkova, Food Day (10/24/2014) Campaign Manager, is reporting school lunches are improving! “This is due to the groundbreaking Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 which set nutrition and health standards for school food.”

Check out the new UDSA Smart Snacks guidelines too!

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Never Feed Your Child Using This Because You Want Them to be Healthy

Lisa Says:  Good points to consider in this article from Dr. Mercola with data from such as the CDC and Environmental Working Group on how our environment can significantly impact infant health.  Plastic bottles? Formula? Microwaves? Rice Cereal?  Common to our lifestyles now yet at what cost?  How is this impacting skyrocketing food allergies?  Autism? Childhood [...]

Lisa Says:  Good points to consider in this article from Dr. Mercola with data from such as the CDC and Environmental Working Group on how our environment can significantly impact infant health.  Plastic bottles? Formula? Microwaves? Rice Cereal?  Common to our lifestyles now yet at what cost?  How is this impacting skyrocketing food allergies?  Autism? Childhood obesity?    Of course, there is also data claiming there aren’t health concerns with some of these issues, so you need to make your own decision.  After Rex’s cancer diagnosis, we studied a lot of data and decided, “What harm is there in playing it safe and using BPA free plastics and NOT using the microwave?  None.”   But there’s no reason to throw the baby out with the bath water (pardon the pun). So we started gradual changes, and if that’s your decision, just start small if you wish.  It’s easier than you think and if you ever have questions, feel free to reach us at Rex@HungerForHealth.com.  Enjoy the article!

Never Feed Your Child Using This Because You Want Them to be Healthy

Posted By Dr. Mercola | June 10 2011

Microwaveable Baby FoodWith escalating rates of childhood illness these days, it is more important than ever to be careful about what you feed your child, from day one. Babies are already born at considerable risk due to the toxic load of their mothers. Some of this is from exposure to plastics and the contaminants present therein, such as BPA (Bisphenol A). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has detected BPA in the urine of 95 percent of people tested.

And now there’s evidence these toxins are being spread to babies even BEFORE they’re born.

In 2009, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found an average of 287 toxins, including BPA, mercury, fire retardants, and pesticides, in the umbilical cord blood of American infants. If your baby is exposed to numerous toxic compounds in utero, it lengthens the period of exposure to carcinogens, thereby making your child more susceptible to cancer and other diseases later in life.

This underscores the importance of minimizing your child’s risk for exposure to toxic compounds in the foods you feed him.  Continue reading »

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(Food) Rules Worth Following, for Everyone’s Sake

Lisa Says: here’s a New York Times article published last week highlighting Michael Pollan’s new book “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual,” as a response to the rapidly declining health in this country. Many of these suggestions are similar to how we addressed Rex’s cancer naturally and have had such success reclaiming our health. [...]

Lisa Says: here’s a New York Times article published last week highlighting Michael Pollan’s new book “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual,” as a response to the rapidly declining health in this country. Many of these suggestions are similar to how we addressed Rex’s cancer naturally and have had such success reclaiming our health. Enjoy the article, and thanks for the info Bert !

Rules Worth Following, for Everyone’s Sake Published: February 1, 2010 By JANE E. BRODY
New York Times

In the more than four decades that I have been reading and writing about the findings of nutritional science, I have come across nothing more intelligent, sensible and simple to follow than the 64 principles outlined in a slender, easy-to-digest new book called “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual,” by Michael Pollan.
Mr. Pollan is not a biochemist or a nutritionist but rather a professor of science journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. You may recognize his name as the author of two highly praised books on food and nutrition, “In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto” and “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” (All three books are from Penguin.)

If you don’t have the time and inclination to read the first two, you can do yourself and your family no better service than to invest $11 and one hour to whip through the 139 pages of “Food Rules” and adapt its guidance to your shopping and eating habits.

Chances are you’ve heard any number of the rules before. I, for one, have been writing and speaking about them for decades. And chances are you’ve yet to put most of them into practice. But I suspect that this little book, which is based on research but not annotated, can do more than the most authoritative text to get you motivated to make some important, lasting, health-promoting and planet-saving changes in what and how you eat.

Reasons to Change

Two fundamental facts provide the impetus Americans and other Westerners need to make dietary changes. One, as Mr. Pollan points out, is that populations who rely on the so-called Western diet — lots of processed foods, meat, added fat, sugar and refined grains — “invariably suffer from high rates of the so-called Western diseases: obesity, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.” Indeed, 4 of the top 10 killers of Americans are linked to this diet.

As people in Asian and Mediterranean countries have become more Westernized (affluent, citified and exposed to the fast foods exported from the United States), they have become increasingly prone to the same afflictions.
The second fact is that people who consume traditional diets, free of the ersatz foods that line our supermarket shelves, experience these diseases at much lower rates. And those who, for reasons of ill health or dietary philosophy, have abandoned Western eating habits often experience a rapid and significant improvement in their health indicators.

I will add a third reason: our economy cannot afford to continue to patch up the millions of people who each year develop a diet-related ailment, and our planetary resources simply cannot sustain our eating style and continue to support its ever-growing population.

In his last book, Mr. Pollan summarized his approach in just seven words: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” The new book provides the practical steps, starting with advice to avoid “processed concoctions,” no matter what the label may claim (“no trans fats,” “low cholesterol,” “less sugar,” “reduced sodium,” “high in antioxidants” and so forth).

As Mr. Pollan puts it, “If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.”

Do you already avoid products made with high-fructose corn syrup? Good, but keep in mind, sugar is sugar, and if it is being added to a food that is not normally sweetened, avoid it as well. Note, too, that refined flour is hardly different from sugar once it gets into the body.
Also avoid foods advertised on television, imitation foods and food products that make health claims. No natural food is simply a collection of nutrients, and a processed food stripped of its natural goodness to which nutrients are then added is no bargain for your body.

Those who sell the most healthful foods — vegetables, fruits and whole grains — rarely have a budget to support national advertising. If you shop in a supermarket (and Mr. Pollan suggests that wherever possible, you buy fresh food at farmers’ markets), shop the periphery of the store and avoid the center aisles laden with processed foods. Note, however, that now even the dairy case has been invaded by products like gunked-up yogurts.

Follow this advice, and you will have to follow another of Mr. Pollan’s rules: “Cook.”

“Cooking for yourself,” he writes, “is the only sure way to take back control of your diet from the food scientists and food processors.” Home cooking need not be arduous or very time-consuming, and you can make up time spent at the stove with time saved not visiting doctors or shopping for new clothes to accommodate an expanding girth.

Although the most wholesome eating pattern consists of three leisurely meals a day, and preferably a light meal at night, if you must have snacks, stick to fresh and dried fruits, vegetables and nuts, which are naturally loaded with healthful nutrients. I keep a dish of raisins and walnuts handy to satisfy the urge to nibble between meals. I also take them along for long car trips. Feel free to use the gas-station restroom, but never “get your fuel from the same place your car does,” Mr. Pollan writes.

Treating Treats as Treats

Perhaps the most important rules to put into effect as soon as possible are those aimed at the ever-expanding American waistline. If you eat less, you can afford to pay more for better foods, like plants grown in organically enriched soil and animals that are range-fed.

He recommends that you do all your eating at a table, not at a desk, while working, watching television or driving. If you’re not paying attention to what you’re eating, you’re likely to eat more than you realize.

But my favorite tip, one that helped me keep my weight down for decades, is a mealtime adage, “Stop eating before you’re full” — advice that has long been practiced by societies as diverse as Japan and France. (There is no French paradox, by the way: the French who stay slim eat smaller portions, leisurely meals and no snacks.)

Practice portion control and eat slowly to the point of satiation, not fullness. The food scientists Barbara J. Rolls of Penn State and Brian Wansink of Cornell, among others, have demonstrated that people eat less when served smaller portions on smaller plates. “There is nothing wrong with special occasion foods, as long as every day is not a special occasion,” Mr. Pollan writes. “Special occasion foods offer some of the great pleasures of life, so we shouldn’t deprive ourselves of them, but the sense of occasion needs to be restored.”

Here is where I can make an improvement. Ice cream has been a lifelong passion, and even though I stick to a brand lower in fat and calories than most, and limit my portion to the half-cup serving size described on the container, I indulge in this treat almost nightly. Perhaps I’ll try the so-called S policy Mr. Pollan says some people follow: “No snacks, no seconds, no sweets — except on days that begin with the letter S.”
More Articles in Health » A version of this article appeared in print on February 2, 2010, on page D7 of the New York edition.

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Top 10 Most Hated Foods Kids Should Eat

Lisa Says: great article here on foods we should be eating but generally don’t because we THINK they don’t taste good (au contraire!). While at the national GreenFest in DC recently, we heard noted pediatrician Dr. Greene speak on food ‘imprinting’ which is how we got to eating the foods we do and how to [...]

Lisa Says: great article here on foods we should be eating but generally don’t because we THINK they don’t taste good (au contraire!). While at the national GreenFest in DC recently, we heard noted pediatrician Dr. Greene speak on food ‘imprinting’ which is how we got to eating the foods we do and how to get ourselves, AND KIDS, ‘retrained’ to eat tasty nutritious foods – but that’s the next post. Enjoy the article from Men’s Fitness magazine.
10 Most Hated Foods
And why you should be eating them right now

by Ryan McKee

http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/293

Children are expected to say things like, “I don’t eat eggs, ever.” Or, “Liver? Gross!” However, when adults do it they better have a severe allergy or a convincing health, political, or environmental argument to back it up. Not liking a food, no matter how it’s prepared, makes you seem like an unworldly country bumpkin. On a first date, it tells your companion that you’re unadventurous and unhealthy because your diet rarely strays far from the beaten path.

Most of us developed these food phobias during childhood, but it’s never too late to get over them. In fact, foods many people hated as children not only provide essential nutrients for adult bodies but they house a potpourri of savors, tangs, and zests. Here are the most common “ick” foods that are actually incredibly good for you—and tasty.

1. BRUSSELS SPROUTS
It’s easy to hate these mini-cabbages without even trying them. They’re the knee-jerk low-water mark for kids. The bitter taste, odd texture, and vague aroma of feet are enough to scare anyone off. However, the same qualities are attributed to fine cheeses.

Health benefits
Very high in fiber and protein, it can be a filling but low-calorie side dish. Scientists also believe the vegetable may protect against cancer because it’s rich in indole—a phytochemical—and vitamin C.

Learn to like it
Buy fresh Brussels sprouts that are still on the stalk. These will taste much better than the frozen. Slice each one down the middle and cook them in extra-virgin olive oil with freshly chopped garlic on the stove. Salt and pepper to your taste. To “gourmet-it-up,” add walnuts, shallots, grated cheese, and bacon in moderation.

2. BROCCOLI
These “mini-trees” pack a healthy dose of vitamin K that you typically find in leafy green vegetables. No wonder children view florets with contempt; they represent the antithesis of Snickers bars. However, broccoli can be a man’s best friend. Simple to prepare, it’s a filling side-dish or quick raw snack.

Health benefits
Vitamins C, K, and A are all represented in spades in broccoli. As well as being high in fiber, it has multiple anti-cancer nutrients such as diindolylmethane and selenium. The diindolylmethane is also known to fight other viruses and bacteria. In studies, men who eat a lot of broccoli generally reduce their risk of aggressive prostate cancer and heart disease.

Learn to like it
There’s no need to avoid broccoli on the appetizer tray, just dip it in hummus or add a dab of ranch dressing. You can also crumble some florets on your salad; they will make it more filling. Steam or bake them with olive oil for a quick side dish. If you decide to go more extreme, cover a casserole dish with florets. Pour three tablespoons of melted butter over it and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle cheddar cheese on top and bake for 10 – 15 minutes.

3. FISH
Children find everything wrong with seafood: fishy smell and taste, texture, bone paranoia, etc. However, as an adult, not enjoying the sea’s bounty limits you from multiple ethnic cuisines. Not only that, it is the perfect protein source to help you lose weight and cut down on meat with saturated fat.

Health benefits
The American Heart Association recommends men eat fish twice a week to get enough omega-3, the fatty acids that reduce the risk of heart disease and the most common type of stroke. Some research even suggests omega-3s increase brain and visual functions and fight everything from asthma to depression. Eating fish instead of other meats can also reduce your cholesterol.

Learn to like it
Not all fish has that fishy-taste. Try halibut, tilapia, mahi-mahi, or throw a tuna steak on the grill instead of a burger. Stuffed flounder will taste like whatever you stuff it with. You can even start with something as small as a couple anchovies in your Caesar’s salad. And there’s the whole world of shellfish and mollusks too. Buy some tempura batter mix and it’s easy to make lightly breaded fish that go great with potatoes or in tacos.

4. TURNIPS
Whoever ever figured out that turnips could be eaten must have been really hungry. They don’t look the least bit appetizing. A bulbous purple root, most men wouldn’t pick one up in the grocery store and think, “Let’s have a go at this.” You wouldn’t even know where to start.

Health benefits
Turnips are a strong source of vitamin C, fiber, folic acid, manganese, pantothenic acid, and copper; plus they contain thiamine, potassium, niacin, and magnesium. They’re starchy like potatoes, but with one-third the calories.

Learn to like it
Substitute turnips where you usually make potatoes. Not only will this diversify your at-home menu, it will cut down on caloric intake. You can bake, mash, and cut them into French fries. They can also be served raw on a veggie tray.

5. BEETS
Many men pass over beets on the salad bar without ever trying them. It can be hard to know what to make of them. They look like slices of canned cranberry jelly. However, their sweet taste jazzes up a salad. Canned beets even make a cheap, quick, healthy snack by themselves.

Health benefits
High in carbohydrates, they’re a quick energy source without the crash you get from processed carbs. Beets are good source of magnesium, calcium, iron, and niacin, as well as vitamins A and C. Studies also show they reduce the risk of colon cancer.

Learn to like them
Throwing a couple on a salad is an easy way to get used to the odd-looking vegetable. When you’re ready to dive in, make a beet salad. There are a variety of recipes that are tasty and will impress a female dinner guest. A great southern favorite is roasted beet salad with bacon.

6. LIVER
Just the thought of eating this internal organ will make some people gag. However, eating liver dates back centuries. Certain prehistoric tribes regarded it as the delicacy from the hunt. Medieval Europeans turned liver into everything from pastries to sausages. Get in touch with your primal man—eat liver.

Health benefits
Obviously it is a good source of protein, but it is also nature’s most concentrated source of vitamin A. Patients with iron-deficiencies eat it due to its highly usable form of iron and all of the B vitamins. Many also claim it fights fatigue.

Learn to like it
Preparing liver doesn’t have to be a big event. The next time you crave a barbecued steak, substitute thinly sliced beef liver. Fry it in a pan with onions and your favorite barbecue sauce or right on the grill.

7. SPINACH
Popeye made spinach look great when he used it to beat up Bluto. However, when you popped a can and dug in, it tasted like soggy metal. While these green leaves use to primarily appear in cartoons, now they appear on most menus across the country. So ditch the can and prepare a dish that does the leafy vegetable justice.

Health benefits
Like the other vegetables profiled already, spinach’s A and C vitamins, fiber, folic acid, magnesium and other nutrients help prevent cancer, especially colon, lung, and breast cancers, and heart disease. Also the flavonoids in it reduce against age-related memory loss. But a big one in spinach is lutein, which prevents cataracts and macular degeneration.

Learn to like it
The great thing about spinach is its versatility. Throw it in omelets with cheese, turkey, or ham. Pour warm bacon vinaigrette over a bed of spinach and chopped purple onions (a little bit of bacon seems to help mask all healthy foods). Even toss raw spinach with melted margarine and heat in the microwave for a quick side dish. Want to keep it extra simple? Chop up strawberries and walnuts and sprinkle them over a bed of fresh spinach for a delicious salad.

8. AVOCADO
For those who didn’t grow up in the Southwest or California, you may find this creamy green fruit bit odd odd. However, avocados yield the culinary wonder known as guacamole, something no Mexican dish can be without.

Health benefits
Dubbed the world’s healthiest fruit for its source of vitamin K, dietary fiber, potassium, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin C, copper, and oleic acid, a medium avocado can have 27 grams of fat. However, its monounsaturated fat helps lower cholesterol and its folate aids heart health.

Learn to like it
If guacamole hasn’t already turned you on to avocados, add a wedge to a turkey sandwich instead of cheese. Or slice a little with black beans and rice for a hot lunch. The protein will satiate your hunger longer.

9. COTTAGE CHEESE
Curdled milk chunks? Well, when one puts it like that, it’s obvious why children aren’t clamoring for this filling snack. Men don’t usually like this dairy delight as much as women, but we should.

Health benefits
High in protein and low in carbohydrates, cottage cheese is a breakfast that will stay with you. Most of its protein is casein, a slow digesting form that reduces hunger for longer periods of time. It’s also high in calcium, which is important not only for bones but maintaining normal blood pressure.

Learn to like it
If eating cottage cheese with sliced fruit doesn’t intrigue you, try adding hot sauce and salt. It’s great sweet or savory. If you’re already a fan of guacamole, add a few spoons of cottage cheese to your mix. It will make it heartier and prevent it from turning brown.

10. EGGPLANT
If the eggplant were a superhero, it would be Batman. It’s dark, mysterious, and although it doesn’t have superpowers — it’s bold and rich on different levels. Children can’t get past its spongy texture, but adults should champion its ability to adapt differently to each dish.

Health benefits
It has much of the same laundry list of nutrients these other vegetables have offered including fiber, folate, niacin, etc. On top of that, eggplants are a great source of antioxidant called phytonutrients including the potent antioxidant called nasunin, which prevents the damage of cell membranes.

Learn to like it
Eggplant’s porous flesh soaks in whatever flavors surround it and adds its own, making complex tastes: Eggplant Parmesan, ratatouille, Arabian moussaka, and many Indian dishes. It’s a vegetarian’s favorite because it’s a great substitute for meat-based dishes. It can even be grilled like a burger. Each dish is completely different so keep trying.

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The 7 foods experts won't eat

Lisa Says: Mainstream is even now suggesting not to eat certain foods that we happened to change in our own lifestyle to address Rex’s cancer naturally. REST ASSURED we most certainly still eat everything on this list – just the organic, free range, wild caught or chemical free varieties. Enjoy the article from Prevention magazine.
The [...]

Lisa Says: Mainstream is even now suggesting not to eat certain foods that we happened to change in our own lifestyle to address Rex’s cancer naturally. REST ASSURED we most certainly still eat everything on this list – just the organic, free range, wild caught or chemical free varieties. Enjoy the article from Prevention magazine.

The 7 foods experts won’t eat
* by Liz Vaccariello, Editor-in-Chief, PREVENTION, on Tue Nov 24, 2009 11:15am PST

How healthy (or not) certain foods are—for us, for the environment—is a hotly debated topic among experts and consumers alike, and there are no easy answers. But when Prevention talked to the people at the forefront of food safety and asked them one simple question—“What foods do you avoid?”—we got some pretty interesting answers. Although these foods don’t necessarily make up a “banned” list, as you head into the holidays—and all the grocery shopping that comes with it—their answers are, well, food for thought:

1. Canned Tomatoes

The expert: Fredrick vom Saal, PhD, an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A

The problem: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity (a prominent characteristic of tomatoes) causes BPA to leach into your food. Studies show that the BPA in most people’s body exceeds the amount that suppresses sperm production or causes chromosomal damage to the eggs of animals. “You can get 50 mcg of BPA per liter out of a tomato can, and that’s a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young,” says vom Saal. “I won’t go near canned tomatoes.”

The solution: Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings), such as the brands Bionaturae and Coluccio. You can also get several types in Tetra Pak boxes, like Trader Joe’s and Pomi.

14 worst health mistakes even smart women make.

2. Corn-Fed Beef

The expert: Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming

The problem: Cattle evolved to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. More money for cattle farmers (and lower prices at the grocery store) means a lot less nutrition for us. A recent comprehensive study conducted by the USDA and researchers from Clemson University found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease. “We need to respect the fact that cows are herbivores, and that does not mean feeding them corn and chicken manure,” says Salatin.

The solution: Buy grass-fed beef, which can be found at specialty grocers, farmers’ markets, and nationally at Whole Foods. It’s usually labeled because it demands a premium, but if you don’t see it, ask your butcher.

25 ridiculously healthy foods you should be eating now.

3. Microwave Popcorn

The expert: Olga Naidenko, PhD, a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group,

The problem: Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize—and migrate into your popcorn. “They stay in your body for years and accumulate there,” says Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.

The solution: Pop natural kernels the old-fashioned way: in a skillet. For flavorings, you can add real butter or dried seasonings, such as dillweed, vegetable flakes, or soup mix.

Your nutritional guide to grocery shopping.

4. Nonorganic Potatoes

The expert: Jeffrey Moyer, chair of the National Organic Standards Board

The problem: Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. In the case of potatoes—the nation’s most popular vegetable—they’re treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. “Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won’t,” says Moyer, who is also farm director of the Rodale Institute (also owned by Rodale Inc., the publisher of Prevention). “I’ve talked with potato growers who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals.”

The solution: Buy organic potatoes. Washing isn’t good enough if you’re trying to remove chemicals that have been absorbed into the flesh.

14 ways to make veggies less boring.

5. Farmed Salmon

The expert: David Carpenter, MD, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany and publisher of a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish.

The problem: Nature didn’t intend for salmon to be crammed into pens and fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers. As a result, farmed salmon is lower in vitamin D and higher in contaminants, including carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides such as dioxin and DDT. According to Carpenter, the most contaminated fish come from Northern Europe, which can be found on American menus. “You can only safely eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer,” says Carpenter, whose 2004 fish contamination study got broad media attention. “It’s that bad.” Preliminary science has also linked DDT to diabetes and obesity, but some nutritionists believe the benefits of omega-3s outweigh the risks. There is also concern about the high level of antibiotics and pesticides used to treat these fish. When you eat farmed salmon, you get dosed with the same drugs and chemicals.

The solution: Switch to wild-caught Alaska salmon. If the package says fresh Atlantic, it’s farmed. There are no commercial fisheries left for wild Atlantic salmon.
Delicious and easy fish recipes

6. Milk Produced with Artificial Hormones

The expert: Rick North, project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society

The problem: Milk producers treat their dairy cattle with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST, as it is also known) to boost milk production. But rBGH also increases udder infections and even pus in the milk. It also leads to higher levels of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor in milk. In people, high levels of IGF-1 may contribute to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. “When the government approved rBGH, it was thought that IGF-1 from milk would be broken down in the human digestive tract,” says North. As it turns out, the casein in milk protects most of it, according to several independent studies. “There’s not 100% proof that this is increasing cancer in humans,” admits North. “However, it’s banned in most industrialized countries.”

The solution: Check labels for rBGH-free, rBST-free, produced without artificial hormones, or organic milk. These phrases indicate rBGH-free products.
Don’t be fooled by these 11 health food imposters.

7. Conventional Apples

The expert: Mark Kastel, former executive for agribusiness and codirector of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods

The problem: If fall fruits held a “most doused in pesticides contest,” apples would win. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. As such, apples don’t develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. But Kastel counters that it’s just common sense to minimize exposure by avoiding the most doused produce, like apples. “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers,” he says. And increasing numbers of studies are starting to link a higher body burden of pesticides (from all sources) with Parkinson’s disease.

The solution: Buy organic apples. If you can’t afford organic, be sure to wash and peel them first.

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Healthy You" – Weight Management Program for Kids

Rex Says: Got a great referral today from local media story on this site for promoting healthy school lunches. Remember, American kids today are now predicted to have a lower life expectancy their own parents, for the first time in history. Just to clarify, go more in depth in ingredients and eliminate [...]

Rex Says: Got a great referral today from local media story on this site for promoting healthy school lunches. Remember, American kids today are now predicted to have a lower life expectancy their own parents, for the first time in history. Just to clarify, go more in depth in ingredients and eliminate chemicals such as High Fructose Corn Syrup which is clearly shown to cause diabetes, etc. (see our other posts).

This seems to be a great local support and educational system for families on living healthier. http://www.chkd.org/Services/HealthyYou/

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Checking treatments for common ailments

Rex Says: The government falls short yet again but at least they realize what we are doing in America is not working. But they refuse to consider the additional choice of balancing your body’s pH as an option, for instance. No money in that though.
Checking treatments for common ailments
By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
Updated: 07/02/2009 01:41:55 AM [...]

Rex Says: The government falls short yet again but at least they realize what we are doing in America is not working. But they refuse to consider the additional choice of balancing your body’s pH as an option, for instance. No money in that though.

Checking treatments for common ailments

By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
Updated: 07/02/2009 01:41:55 AM PDT

http://www.montereyherald.com/health/ci_12739661?source=rss

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The Mediterranean Diet Explained

Rex Says: a huge part of addressing my cancer naturally was making the switch to a Mediterranean Diet. It was definately a change, but simple. We did it in stages and have NEVER eaten as well as we do now. More and more clinical data is supporting the all encompassing impact of [...]

Rex Says: a huge part of addressing my cancer naturally was making the switch to a Mediterranean Diet. It was definately a change, but simple. We did it in stages and have NEVER eaten as well as we do now. More and more clinical data is supporting the all encompassing impact of nutrition and health.

The Mediterranean Diet Explained
by Kirk Patrick, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) Well-known for promoting longevity, the Mediterranean diet is based on a wide spectrum of popular health foods. Bordering some 21 countries including France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, Morocco, Spain, Syria and Turkey, the Mediterranean Sea is a rather large area. While the most nutritious ingredients in particular have long been the subject of debate, preparing whole meals from scratch is best for optimizing the medicinal benefits (and flavor). The following article will explore ten of the healthiest foods from the Mediterranean diet.

The Mediterranean Top Ten

Part I: Top 5 Protein Sources

* Lamb (Sheep) – Ovis aries (Bovidae)

Sheep less than one year old are called lamb, where older sheep are called mutton. Even commercial lots tend to raise them more humanely than beef. Lamb contains vitamin B, iron, protein, tryptophan, and zinc. Grass-fed lamb contains Omega-3. Lamb tallow (lard) is useful for cooking. Lamb bones contain large amounts of gelatin and are stewed into stock used (with barley) in a soup called Scotch Broth.

* Wheat (Bulgar) – Triticum spp. (Poaceae)

A form of wheat that is parboiled and de-branned, bulgar should not to be confused with cracked wheat (crushed wheat berries). Wheat contains vitamins B1, B2, B3 and iron, along with magnesium, manganese, fiber, and tryptophan. Bulgar is low in fat, high in fiber, and contains protein. Bulgar is used in tabouli.

* Sesame (seed) – Sesamum indicum (Pedaliacea)

Sesame seeds contain lineolic acid, an unsaturated essential Omega-6 fatty acid. Sesame contains vitamin B3, E, folic acid, and protein. Sesame seeds are native to Africa, and are made into a paste called tahini (a key component in both hummus and baba ganoush).

* Garbanzo (bean) – Cicer arietinum (Faboideae)

Also called chick peas, garbanzo beans contain tryptophan, copper, fiber, folate, iron, manganese, molybdenum, protein, phosphorous and tryptophan. Originating in the Middle East, these legumes help lower cholesterol, balance blood sugar levels, and contain natural sulfites that feature detoxifying properties. Garbanzo beans are a key component in hummus. As with most grains, dried garbanzo beans are sprouting seeds.

* Pine (nut) – Pinus pinea (Pinaceae)

The seeds to pine trees, pine nuts contain the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid along with vitamins A, C, and D. Pine nuts contain protein and fiber. Pine nuts help to improve cardiovascular health, strengthen teeth and bones, boost the immune system, sharpen vision and help the body to absorb other nutrients. Pine nuts are a key component in pesto.

Part II: Top 5 Plant Foods

* Olive – Olea Europaea (Oleaceae)

Fresh olives along with oil from the first cold pressing contain oleic acid, a healthy monounsaturated fatty acid. Olives help lower blood pressure, treat asthma, relieve arthritis, prevent diabetes, increase metabolism and help treat and prevent cancer. Olives have anti-inflammatory properties.

* Grape (leaf and fruit) – Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae)

Red grapes contain anthocyanins, known for their cardiovascular protective effects, along with vitamins A, B1, B2 and C. Grapes also contain flavonoids, tannins, tartrates, inositol, carotenes, choline and pectin. The sap of the grape vine is used as an eyewash. Grapes are fermented to make red wine, white wine and balsamic vinegar. The ashes of burnt grape branches are a natural tooth whitener if used over the long term. Both grape leaves and grape vinegar have anti-inflammatory effects and soothe irritated skin. Grapes reduce digestive problems, relieve menstruation symptoms, and strengthen capillaries. As grape plasma is close to blood plasma, “grape fasts” are used for detoxification.

* Eggplant – Solanum melongena (Solanaceae)

Eggplant contains nasunin, a phytonutrient, flavonoid and antioxidant. Also called aubergine, eggplant contains caffeic and chlorogenic acid (phenolic compounds) along with magnesium and potassium. Eggplant protects the brain from free radical damage, reduces cholesterol and improves cardiovascular health. A member of the nightshade family, eggplant has antibacterial, antifungal and antimicrobial properties.

* Parsley – Petroselinum crispum (Umbelliferae)

Parsley contains myristicin and aiole both volatile oils and antioxidants. Parsley also contains vitamins A, C, and E along with bergapten, flavonoids, iron, coumarins, and phthalides. Also a natural pain reliever, parsley relieves menstruation. Fresh parsley can be chewed to neutralize garlic breath. Parsley root has medicinal properties also. Parsley has anti-inflammatory properties.

* Mint (leaf) – Mentha x piperita (Lamiaceae)

Peppermint contains menthol and menthone, both volatile oils, along with the antioxidants luteolin and menthoside. A natural digestive aid, peppermint relaxes the abdominal muscles, reduces nausea, relieves constipation and soothes irritated skins. A natural pain reliever, peppermint oil relieves headaches and even migraines when rubbed on the temples. A hybrid of spearmint (menthe spicata) and watermint (menthe hirsute), peppermint has antibacterial, antifungal and antispasmodic properties.

Part III: Serving Suggestions

Lamb is often mixed with beef where it is slow cooked, sliced thin and served on pita bread (Gyros). This dish is served with a blend of cucumber, yogurt and dill called Tzaziki sauce.

However a much easier (and healthier) dish is also one of the easiest foods to make at home: hummus. The only four required ingredients are garbanzo beans, tahini, lemon and garlic. Optional ingredients include olive oil, red pepper, and sun-dried tomato.

For hummus, mix 1 can of garbanzo with 1/2 cup tahini (about a 2 to 1 ratio of mostly beans). Add the juice of 1 lemon and 1-3 garlic cloves, and optional ingredients.

For baba ganoush, substitute mashed (cooked) eggplant for garbanzo beans in the hummus recipe. Mash or blend ingredients and sprinkle with paprika for color.

Serve with pita bread, lemon wedges and sprigs of parsley.

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References

The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants – Dorling Kindersley and Andrew Chevallier

More on Garbanzo

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?…

More on Grapes

http://hubpages.com/hub/Health_Bene…

Countries bordering the Mediterranean

http://www.mediterranean-yachting.c…

1 Comment

Save money, the environment and improve health by growing your own food

Lisa Says: Americans being so out of touch with their food supplies has taken a huge toll on our health and the environment. The average ‘food’ travels 1500 miles to the average American. Growing some veges is so easy, no matter how big or small a sapce you have. The world [...]

Lisa Says: Americans being so out of touch with their food supplies has taken a huge toll on our health and the environment. The average ‘food’ travels 1500 miles to the average American. Growing some veges is so easy, no matter how big or small a sapce you have. The world is ‘going green’ so it’s CHIC and this is an easy way to save money, get far more nutritious foods that TASTE so much better, and help the environment.

If anyone has any questions from how to plant a patio tomato to installing raised gardens (really easy), just let me know and I’ll be happy to give individual advice.

Here’s a plug for bringing back ‘Victory Gardens”. A time during WWII when the country rallied together during such difficult times.

http://www.revivevictorygarden.org/

What is a Victory Garden?

During World War I and World War II, the United States government asked its citizens to plant gardens in order to support the war effort. Millions of people planted gardens. In 1943, Americans planted over 20 million Victory Gardens, and the harvest accounted for nearly a third of all the vegetables consumed in the country that year. Emphasis was placed on making gardening a family or community effort — not a drudgery, but a pastime, and a national duty.

Why plant a victory garden?

Today our food travels an average of 1500 miles from farm to table. The process of planting, fertilizing, processing, packaging, and transporting our food uses a great deal of energy and contributes to the cause of global warming.

Planting a Victory Garden to fight global warming would reduce the amount of pollution your food contibutes to global warming. Instead of traveling many miles from farm to table, your food would travel from your own garden to your table.

Our current economic situation is other good reason to start a Victory Garden. Every time that food is shipped from the farm to the store and your table, gasoline is used. As gasoline prices rise, food costs rise.

How can my actions make a difference? I’m only one person.

Each one of us may only be one person. However, we each have an impact on the environment and can make changes to reduce our impact.

I have no backyard, what can I do?

You can combine vegetable plants with flowers in your frontyard.
You can plant containers on your porch, patio, or balcony and can grow sprouts indoors.
Check to see if you have a community garden available.
Perhaps a neighbor or friend without time or ability would let you garden their yard, in exchange for some produce.
If these options are not available, you can also choose to purchase foods which are grown close to home by visiting your local farmer’s market or joining a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture). If local foods are not available to you, choose foods which use fewer chemical pesticides – such as organics, are in season, or have minimal packaging.

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Organic Foods Provide More than Health Benefits

Lisa Says: yet more evidence on higher nutritional value of organic food. Want to save money in these challenging economic times? Purchase the most nutritionally dense foods, so you’ll buy less and be healthier so also potentially spend less on health care.
Organic Foods Provide More than Health Benefits
by Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist
(NaturalNews) Organic foods [...]

Lisa Says: yet more evidence on higher nutritional value of organic food. Want to save money in these challenging economic times? Purchase the most nutritionally dense foods, so you’ll buy less and be healthier so also potentially spend less on health care.

Organic Foods Provide More than Health Benefits
by Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) Organic foods can be considered to be better and healthier not only for the consumer but also for the environment. Organic foods are considered to be more nutrient dense than their counterparts produced via modern farming practices.

Dr. David Thomas, a physician and researcher, has studied and compared the United States government guidelines and tables for the nutritional content of various foods. These tables have been published by the government first in 1940 and again in 2002. Dr. Thomas has noticed a trend that supports the decline in the nutritional quality of fruits and vegetables produced via modern farming practices in recent decades. Because of his research Dr. Thomas has posed the following question, “Why is it that you have to eat four carrots to get the same amount of magnesium as you would have done in 1940?”

A study published in the Journal of Applied Nutrition lists many nutrients that appear to be altered based on how they are farmed. The study looked at organic apples, pear, potatoes, wheat, and sweet corn and compared the levels of certain nutrients in relation to the commercially available counterparts produced via modern farming practices. The study lists the macronutrient chromium as being found at levels 78% higher in organic foods. The study also showed that Calcium is found at a level 63% higher in organic foods and Magnesium is found at a level 138% higher in organic foods. Other studies have shown that the use of pesticides can also alter the levels of certain vitamins including B vitamins, vitamin C, and beta-carotene in fruits and vegetables.

In 2003 a study was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry which found that organic corn had 52% more vitamin C than the commercially available counterpart which was grown utilizing modern farming practices. This study also found that polyphenol levels were significantly higher in the organic corn.

While many studies have been done looking into the benefits of organic produce there still is much to be learned. Dr. Marion Nestle the chair of New York University’s department of nutrition, food studies and public health has said, “I don’t think there is any question that as more research is done, it is going to become increasingly apparent that organic food is healthier.”

Many studies including a study recently published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) have done much to reinforce the perception of many American consumers that organic foods are both better for the consumer and the environment.

http://www.foodnavigator.com/Scienc…

http://lookwayup.com/free/organic.htm

http://www.organicconsumers.org/org…

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