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Drinking Coffee Reduces Risk of Stroke, Cancer and Dementia

Lisa Says: more info on coffee pursuant to the immediate preceeding post. Rex and I still advocate organic fair trade coffee prepared as previously suggested and not your mainstream java choices in order to ensure the health benefits.
Drinking Coffee Reduces Risk of Stroke, Cancer and Dementia
by Barbara Minton, Natural Health Editor
(NaturalNews) It’s a pleasant [...]

Lisa Says: more info on coffee pursuant to the immediate preceeding post. Rex and I still advocate organic fair trade coffee prepared as previously suggested and not your mainstream java choices in order to ensure the health benefits.

Drinking Coffee Reduces Risk of Stroke, Cancer and Dementia
by Barbara Minton, Natural Health Editor

(NaturalNews) It’s a pleasant surprise when something questionable turns out to be full of health benefits. First chocolate was found to prevent heart disease. Then red wine was shown to increase overall longevity. Now the spotlight is on coffee. Newly released studies reveal that coffee drinking lowers risk of stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia. It even improves social skills and depressive symptoms. Other recent research has shown that drinking coffee reduces the risk of diabetes.

There is a reason 90 percent of the population loves coffee

Mother Nature wants people to be healthy and reproduce. She has created in them an attraction to foods that promote good health. Bright, vibrant vegetables that shimmer with energy, luscious fruits, and the dazzling aroma of coffee just can’t be denied. Some of the health benefits of coffee come from its caffeine content. The ability of coffee to lower the risk for Parkinson’s disease and treat asthma and headaches is linked to caffeine. Caffeine can enhance athletic performance by increasing endurance. This is why coffee was designated as a controlled substance until recently by the Olympic Games Committee.

Coffee drinking is major source of antioxidants for most people

People in the U.S. receive most of their antioxidants from the coffee they drink. Scientists have found that a typical serving of coffee contains more antioxidants than a typical serving of blueberries, grape juice, raspberries, or oranges. A cup of coffee contains up to four times as much antioxidant activity as a cup of green tea contains.

Antioxidants protect people from free radicals produced in the body and encountered in the environment and diet. Scientists believe that drinking coffee makes it possible to limit, postpone or prevent many degenerative diseases including cancer, heart disease cataracts, and diseases of the nervous system. Epidemiological studies have shown that adding antioxidant polyphenols to the diet reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Chlorogenic acid is the prominent polyphenol in coffee, although there are others. A Japanese study of 61,000 people found that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop liver cancer that those who abstain. The researchers hypothesized that chlorogenic acid was the cancer fighting agent. Robusta coffee contains up to ten percent chlorogenic acid, and Arabica coffee contains an amount up to seven percent. Caffeic acid is another polyphenol found in coffee that has been shown to protect cells from oxidation. Caffeic acid works together with cholorogenic acid to protect cerebral neurons, promote cell differentiation, and normalize colon function. The combination has been found effective at halting cell proliferation and inducing appropriate cell death in breast cancer cells.

American’s coffee drinking averages more than one cup per day. Decaffeinated coffee has the same antioxidant content as regular coffee. New research findings suggest that the addition of milk to coffee binds the antioxidants and reduces their potential to be effective in the body. A recent study found that caffeic acid was unavailable to the body as the result of it binding with milk added to blueberries.

Coffee consumption and risk of stroke in women

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health assessed the association between coffee consumption and the risk of stroke over a 24 year period of follow-up in women. They analyzed data from a cohort of 83,076 women without history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes or cancer who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study. Coffee consumption was assessed from 1980 through 2004. They documented 2280 varied strokes. After adjusting for confounders, the correlation of coffee drinking with stroke fell by 20 percent in the group drinking the most coffee. The researchers concluded that coffee drinking moderately reduced the risk of stroke. Their study was reported in the February edition of Circulation.

High regular coffee consumption associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk

A hospital based case-control study, reported in the January International Journal of Cancer, examined the associations between endometrial cancer risk and usual consumption of regular and decaffeinated coffee among 541 women with endometrial cancer and 541 women healthy women. Women who drank four or more cups of combined coffee and tea showed a significantly reduced cancer association.

Coffee offers protection against Alzheimer’s disease and dementia

Determining the long-term impact of caffeine on cognition was the aim of a study in Finland, reported in the January Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Scientists specifically looked for the association between coffee and/or tea drinking at midlife and Alzheimer’s disease or dementia in late life. Participants were randomly selected from a population-based cohort previously participating in a longitudinal study. After an average follow-up of 21 years, 1409 individuals aged 65 to 79 completed the re-examination. A total of 61 cases were identified as demented, with 48 having diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease. Coffee drinkers at midlife had lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life compared with those drinking none or only small amounts of coffee. An amazing 65 percent decrease was found in people who drank 3 to 5 cups of coffee per day. Tea drinking showed no association with dementia or Alzheimers’ in this study.

A study reported in the Oct.-Nov. issue of American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, found that caffeine may have a protective effect on the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Antioxidants were also seen as protective through their ability to reduce inflammation.

Risk of type 2 diabetes is lower in coffee drinkers

An older study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that habitual coffee consumption was consistently associated with lower risk of diabetes. Although the exact mechanism of its action was not revealed, the scientists concluded that the antioxidants in coffee help control cell damage that can contribute to the development of the disease. The high concentration of chlorogenic acid in coffee reduces glucose concentrations. The researchers pointed out that their results were not due to caffeine, as decaffeinated coffee produced the same degree of risk reduction.

In a report that combined data from several sources, people who drank four to six cups of coffee a day had a 28 percent reduction in risk of diabetes compared with people who drank two or fewer cups a day. Those who drank even more had a 35 percent reduction.

Coffee increases cooperation and sociability, and decreases depression

A newly released study from the February issue of Nutrition and Neuroscience examined the effects of caffeinated coffee on antidepressant related cooperative behavior. Seventy-seven low level caffeine users took part in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of a single dose of caffeinated coffee and a single dose of decaffeinated coffee with a three day period in between. Participants were asked to play a game with an imagined person. After drinking caffeinated coffee, participants were more open to the imaginary player and displayed fewer signs of sadness. The researchers concluded that only the caffeinated coffee helped to improve social skill and depressive symptoms.

Longitudinal studies have found a significantly lower rate of suicide among men and women who drink two or more cups of coffee each day. Reasons for this were unclear.

More research reveals more benefits

Newer studies continue to add to older, impressive results revealing the benefits of coffee. Drinking two or more cups a day was found to reduce the risk of colon cancer by 25%. The likelihood of developing gallstones was decreased by nearly 50% in those drinking at least two cups of coffee a day. Liver cirrhosis was reduced by a whopping 80% in drinkers of two or more cups a day.

A compound called Trigonelline that has anti-adhesive and antibacterial properties was found to help prevent tooth decay.

For more information:

http://food-facts.suite101.com/arti…

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/15/h…

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Health/st…

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Drink a Healthy Cup of Coffee

Lisa Says: WOOHOO ! We’re doing it right – no guilt here ! Rex diligently purchases our fair trade organic coffee beans, grinds them fresh, heats our distilled water in our french ‘whistling’ kettle, blends the coffee in our french press (thank you Rex Jr), then adds a splash of organic cream [...]

Lisa Says: WOOHOO ! We’re doing it right – no guilt here ! Rex diligently purchases our fair trade organic coffee beans, grinds them fresh, heats our distilled water in our french ‘whistling’ kettle, blends the coffee in our french press (thank you Rex Jr), then adds a splash of organic cream and a little raw organic turbonado. Sounds like a big production but it’s REALLY not and the flavor of the coffee is AMAZINGLY better.

Wednesday, May 06, 2009 by: Kirk Patrick, citizen journalist

NaturalNews) There is likely a cup on your desk right now, but is that coffee healthy or unhealthy? The odds lean toward the latter, but if certain parameters are met coffee can provide certain health benefits. This article will explore the history and medicinal uses of coffee before outlining the key steps required to make the healthiest coffee at home.
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Coffee – Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae)

The fermented, sun-dried and roasted seeds of the coffee plant are commonly known as coffee beans. Coffee beans contain between .06% and .32% caffeine, a powerful stimulant, along with theophylline, a mild stimulant and muscle relaxer. One of the few bitter foods remaining in the Western diet, coffee enhances perception and increases physical performance by stimulating the nervous system, increasing heart output and improving the flow of digestive juices. Also a powerful diuretic, coffee is used to treat acute diarrhea and headaches, and it is also used for detoxification and cleansing. For those working first shift, coffee should only be consumed between 5AM and 5PM as not to disturb sleep patterns.

While a short term stimulant coffee is thought to weaken overall vitality if used every day. Coffee should be avoided by those prone to chronic forms of diarrhea, acid indigestion, high blood pressure or heart palpitations.
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Coffee History

Coffee is native to the East African tropics but is now cultivated in tropical areas worldwide. Coffee was discovered around 1000 AD when a flock of goats were observed jumping in excited fashion when they grazed on coffee berries (each of which contains two coffee seeds or beans). The goatherd, an Arab referred to by some as Khalid and others as Kaldi, decided to eat some of the fruit himself and he immediately felt more alert. As for how it came to be commonly roasted, according to one account some beans were accidentally burned but found to be better tasting that way. However it is also known that the beans were roasted to prevent germination as coffee was a trade secret, so that may have been the real reason they are now commonly sold in roasted form.

Fair Trade, Local and Organic Coffee

Coffee ranks among oil as one of the top export crops in the world. As with oil however, some areas that produce it do not distribute wealth appropriately, and in many cases producers are exploited. Middlemen tend to steal the bulk of the profit and pay barely enough for coffee farmers to survive. Consumers who choose fair trade coffee ensure that the farmers who actually produce their coffee can make a living.

Coffee can be grown at home in southern areas and while it takes 2-3 years to fruit, that is the same as asparagus. Coffee seeds are expensive but can be purchased online.

Because pesticide residue can be compounded when coffee is roasted at high temperatures, choosing organic coffee is worthwhile. The best way to purchase coffee is in bulk 5 or 10 pound bags as this allows one to obtain the finest coffee at an affordable price. However, to avoid monotony it’s important to have at least two varieties. Coffee can be stored in the freezer for long periods and at room temperature if vacuum sealed.
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Top 10 Ways to Make Better Coffee

1) Grind the Beans Fresh – For the freshest coffee possible, purchase whole bean coffee and grind the beans immediately before brewing.

2) Acquire a Mesh Grinder – The best coffee mills grind coffee in one chamber until the grinds are small enough to flow through a variable-sized mesh into another container. This ensures uniform size.

3) Try a Ceramic Kettle – To test your kettle, boil water, let it to cool, and then drink a glass. If it tastes tinny, chances are it contributes unpleasant flavors to your coffee. A ceramic kettle is best, but make sure to get one that whistles or you will eventually hear an expensive crack sound. Avoid products made in China.

4) Filter the Water – Coffee is only as pure as the water is is brewed with. Distilled or reverse osmosis water is ideal. Sink water is not an option though many restaurants use just that.

5) Use a French Press – Course-ground coffee is directly mixed with very hot (versus boiling) water in a glass beaker where it steeps for about 4 minutes. A plunger with a fine screen mesh, built into the lid, is used to move the grinds to the bottom. The canister then serves as a coffee pitcher. The main drawback with a French press is trying to keep the coffee warm. Certain insulated French press are now available. The glass will break if one is not very careful and it costs about $35 to replace. The fine coffee dust that settles in the cup should be avoided as it is mildly carcinogenic due to the roasting process. As with all brewing methods, after 20 minutes the coffee grinds become acidic and should be discarded. Coffee grinds make great fertilizer for the garden as they provide Nitrogen.

6) Choose Evaporated Cane Juice – The best sweetener is raw sugar. While Stevia does not lend itself to Coffee, Agave Nectar is a great sugar substitute, though watch out for imitation Agave.

7) Buy Organic Cream – Perhaps the biggest key to the purity of your coffee is the cream, which is preferred by many people to offset the bitterness of black coffee.
8) Opt for Real Silverware – Those who are really high-maintenence might choose an actual Silver spoon which is naturally antibacterial. In the old days a Silver Dollar was kept in the water barrel to keep it free of pathogens. Silver mechanically purifies water without breeding “super” bugs.

9) Find the Right Cup – As with wine glasses, the right size coffee cup is essential and impacts flavor. The cup radius determines what parts of the tongue the liquid hits first. In the super-sized world of today, the original coffee cup is a dying breed, but it was the ideal size, shape and material for coffee.

10) Alternate with Tea – To get the most enjoyment from your coffee it helps to take a break now and then (less is more). A great alternative to coffee is to periodically switch to Yerba Mate tea. Yerba Mate is a type of green tea that contains less caffeine and tastes great with Stevia. Since decaffeinated coffee is often produced using solvents and/or still contains trace amounts of caffeine, it is not recommended.
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References

The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Andrew Chevallier and Dorling Kindersley.

History of Coffee

http://www.decentcoffee.com/CoffeeH…

Coffee History

http://www.cybercoffee.com.au/histo…

Saudi Arabian Coffee

http://sa.tm.com.sa/tag/arabian-coffee/

Growing Coffee at Home

http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffe…

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Five Ways to Make Your Food Help Save the Planet

Lisa Says: This week is Earth Day and this info is yet another reason that it will help not only our health but our planet by buying local produce and/or growing our own.
Friday, April 17, 2009 by: Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor
(NaturalNews) Every action you take in buying foods and beverages has an [...]

Lisa Says: This week is Earth Day and this info is yet another reason that it will help not only our health but our planet by buying local produce and/or growing our own.

Friday, April 17, 2009 by: Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor

(NaturalNews) Every action you take in buying foods and beverages has an ecological footprint. There is a CO2 footprint associated with every item you buy. From the transportation of the food item to the fossil fuels spent in the farming, ranching or processing of the ingredients, it all adds up to an “ecological footprint” that’s invisible but very real.

How big, exactly, is this ecological footprint? Astonishingly, the eco-footprint of your food is larger than the eco-footprint of the car you drive!

It’s also larger than all the energy you use in your day-to-day life (heating hot water for your shower, heating your home, etc.) and all the travel you pursue. In fact, for the average person the food and beverages they consume are the single largest determining factor of their overall ecological footprint. (Source: Cardiff’s Ecological Footprint study: http://www.cardiff.gov.uk/content.a… )

This is tremendously good news because it means that you can greatly reduce your ecological footprint without having to spend a fortune. You don’t have to “go solar” to save the planet (although it helps). You don’t necessarily need to buy a Prius. The No. 1 thing you can do right now is make new choices in the foods and beverages you purchase and consume.

Making that one change is, without question, the single most powerful thing you can do right now to reduce your ecological footprint. Below, I list the five action items you can follow that will have the most dramatic footprint-lowering effects.

But first, let’s answer the question: Why does this matter at all?

Global warming, ocean acidification and more
CO2 emissions, of course, are causing a sharp increase in the levels of measurable CO in the atmosphere. It’s currently more than 380ppm and rising at an unprecedented rate due to the burning of fossil fuels.

But does this really lead to global warming? Some people (even a few scientists) argue it doesn’t. The chemical composition of the atmosphere has no effect on the climate, they say. That position strikes me as quite odd, especially considering the undeniable fact that glaciers and Arctic ice sheets that have been since the industrial revolution are now melting away right before our very eyes (2008 was a devastating year for the melting of polar ice). See: http://www.canada.com/Technology/th…

Even for those who do not believe CO2 emissions cause global warming, there’s another big reason why CO2 emissions matter: Ocean acidification. When CO2 levels rise in the atmosphere, most of that CO2 gets absorbed by the planet’s oceans. Because CO2 is slightly acidic, this causes the oceans to become more acidic, too.

Why is that so bad? Because the ocean’s creatures can’t build coral reefs in acidic water. The acid decomposes their tiny shells. This is partly why we are already seeing disturbing episodes of “coral reef bleaching” around the world. Coral reefs are dying everywhere, and when they die, the entire marine ecosystem is devastated by the loss of life and biodiversity.

Here’s an important explanation of how this is happening and why rising global temperatures matter: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environme…

So even if you don’t believe CO2 emissions cause global warming, there’s no debate whatsoever that CO2 emissions cause ocean acidification. And that’s reason enough to watch your ecological footprint. Of course, in reality, CO2 emissions also do affect the climate, so there are actually two big reasons to reduce your carbon footprint.

Here are five ways to make that happen with your food and beverage consumption decisions…

1. Buy local food and drink
A big part of the carbon footprint of foods and beverages is found in the fossil fuels used to transport them to your local grocery store. Buying food that’s grown locally largely avoids that footprint, regardless of the type of food. Local dairy and meat products, for example, are “greener” than dairy and meat imported from somewhere else. But using plants as your food source (see #3, below) is the greenest of all.

2. Avoid wasteful packaging
A tremendous amount of energy goes into the creation of food and beverage packaging. Sadly, most of that energy is wasted because the food packaging is quickly discarded by consumers.

To avoid this waste, buy in bulk or purchase minimally-packaged products. Breakfast cereals are a classic case of extremely wasteful packaging with a high carbon footprint. Companies like Nature’s Path offer bulk packaging on some of their cereals, giving you the option of avoiding the wasteful boxes typically used for cereals.

3. Buy plants, not meats and animal products
This is the most important food purchasing strategy of all: Buy plants instead of animal products. This will drastically reduce your carbon footprint. Meats and animal products are extremely resource intensive, requiring enormous amounts of water, food and fossil fuels to produce. In fact, it’s no exaggeration to say that the widespread consumption of meat is not ecologically sustainable.

This doesn’t even consider the issues of animal factory waste runoff or the enormous amount of methane produced by cows (via cow farts). Methane is approximately twenty times worse at causing global warming than CO2, by the way.

This point isn’t about vegetarianism or veganism from a health point of view. That’s a different discussion. This is about reducing or eliminating meat consumption solely from an ecological perspective. And there’s no debate about this issue, either. Factory-farmed animal products are extremely wasteful of Earth’s resources. They have huge “overhead” that makes them a poor choice for eco-conscious individuals. It’s no exaggeration to say that avoiding the consumption of factory-farmed meat does more to reduce your carbon footprint than driving a Prius!

4. Buy minimally-processed foods
Highly-processed foods require a lot of energy and resources to produce. They’re also extremely wasteful in terms of nutrients. White processed sugar, for example, is missing as much as 98% of the original nutrients found in unprocessed cane juice. Taking those nutrients out required a tremendous amount of wasted energy, and that’s why white sugar has a much larger carbon footprint than evaporated cane juice.

The same is true of breads, cereals, canned soups and other processed foods. Anything that isn’t fresh requires energy for processing and cooking. Anything that’s pasteurized, for example, has a much larger carbon footprint than the same foods RAW. That’s because pasteurization requires the foods or beverages to be heated, burning up fossil fuel energy.

RAW living plants, in this way, are the most ecologically-sensitive foods you can buy, grow or consume. (They’re also the healthiest, but that’s a different article…)

5. Grow your own
Finally, the best way to reduce the carbon footprint of your food consumption is to grow your own food. That makes your food so local that it’s in your own back yard!

And you don’t have to grow ALL your own food to make a difference: You can start with basic sprouting right in your own kitchen. The very best kitchen countertop sprouter I’ve found is the EasyGreen Sprouter sold at the best price with free shipping by RawFoodWorld (http://www.therawfoodworld.com/prod…). With this affordable device and a few bucks worth of sprouting seeds, you can grow a considerable portion of your own diet right in your kitchen, anywhere in the world.

Pursuing a backyard garden goes even further, and if you live in the right climate, you can grow a portion of your food just a few steps away from your door. (This is what I’m doing in Ecuador right now, enjoying the amazing carbon footprint reductions of literally being walking distance from my own food supply.)

With some effort on your part, you can grow food in virtually any climate — even Northern Canada. Cold-tolerant blueberries and fruit trees can do remarkably well even in exceedingly cold areas of the planet. And if you’re living in a city with limited space, try following the concepts of “square foot gardening” outlined in the book by the same name: http://www.amazon.com/All-New-Squar…

What you EAT says it all
I notice a lot of people in America acting like they’re “green” because they load up their neighborhood recycling bins with all the wasteful plastic packaging from the toxic products they buy (laundry detergent, milk jugs, lawn chemicals, diet soda, etc.). Hilarious!

Then they buy a Prius so they can save gas on the way to the local steakhouse restaurant where they eat ecologically-disastrous beef dinners. Sad!

They fail to realize the one point I’m hoping YOU realize: You’re not green unless your food is green.

Your food is your No. 1 source of carbon emissions, and unless you are consciously eating local foods or participating in Community Supported Agriculture (http://www.localharvest.org/csa/) or growing your own garden, you’re not really green!

Disturbingly, this even applies to raw foodies who are often buying and consuming raw foods in an ecologically unsustainable way: If you’re living in New York but buying raw vegetables in the winter, all your vegetables have a huge eco-footprint due to the transportation costs involved. It’s nowhere near the carbon footprint of meat, of course, but it’s still not truly “green.”

There’s a legitimate argument — and I don’t support this, but I’m saying it’s a legitimate point of debate — that says hunting and eating deer or Elk in the winter months is far more “green” than importing raw vegetables from Mexico. I don’t support the killing of game animals, but there’s a lot of truth to this argument from a carbon footprint point of view. Hunting animals in your own back yard is “eating local” after all. (If you ever see a raw vegan in the woods with a hunting rifle, get it on video. It’s rarer than a Bigfoot sighting!)

In summary, the two takeaway words from all this are: Eat Local.

These are the two words missing from Michael Pollan’s bestselling book: In Defense of Food, where he says “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

Notably, it should have stated, “Eat LOCAL food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

But Pollan isn’t alone in missing this point: Even many health-conscious people completely fail to recognize the importance of eating local (I certainly did for many years). Eating healthy and eating local are two distinct spheres. A lot of people eat healthy foods but fail to eat local foods. And let’s face it: The whole food infrastructure in America isn’t really set up to allow people to eat local anyway, is it? And with bills like HR 875 in the works — which could conceivably outlaw small, local organic farms — the U.S. government seems to be doing everything in its power to destroy local farms in favor of big, powerful corporate farms (which are extremely wasteful in their use of energy).

So if you’re going to eat local, you’ll have to do it yourself, almost as an act of defiance against the status quo. Society won’t make it easy for you to eat local — you’ll have to go out of your way to make this happen. In the end, though, you’ll be learning skills of self-reliance that will help you survive any disruption or collapse of the global food supply — an event that now seems inevitable due to the abuse of GM foods, monoculture farming, fossil water usage and the loss of honeybee pollinators.

Growing your own food, in many ways, is the single most courageous act you can pursue in modern society. It is a statement of great defiance against the corporate food giants, and a statement of self reliance. It also makes a huge statement about how “green” you really are.

Maybe this is why the pesticide lobby is trying to stop Obama’s organic garden at the White House: http://sustainablog.org/2009/04/11/…

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Good Dietary and Lifestyle Health Habits can Drastically Cut Cancer Risk

Rex Says: Personally, I believe the estimates are too low on how many these lifestyle changes could affect. If cancer has skyrocketed so much in recent years, why WOULDN’T it help more than just a thrid of cancers? Americans certainly haven’t undergone a genetic change in the last 50 years, it’s lifestyle and [...]

Rex Says: Personally, I believe the estimates are too low on how many these lifestyle changes could affect. If cancer has skyrocketed so much in recent years, why WOULDN’T it help more than just a thrid of cancers? Americans certainly haven’t undergone a genetic change in the last 50 years, it’s lifestyle and what we’re exposing ourselves to, but remember, WE HAVE THE CONTROL.

Good Dietary and Lifestyle Health Habits can Drastically Cut Cancer Risk
by Reuben Chow, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) Why do people get cancer? Perhaps more significantly, why have cancer rates soared so drastically over the past century? Is it because of genes? Is it because of what we are eating today? Or are stressful lifestyles to blame? Others put forth that factors such as environmental toxins and electromagnetic radiation are the main culprits. The fact is, cancer is a multi-causal disease and probably a result of a combination of the abovementioned factors. Recent statistics released by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has estimated the role of diet and lifestyle, suggesting that about one-third of the 12 most common types of cancer in richer countries could be prevented merely through a healthy diet, physical activity and the maintenance of healthy weight. In poorer, developing nations, the proportion of cancers preventable through these steps was estimated to be about one-in-four.

Details and Findings of Study

The cancers in question included those of the bowel, breast, gallbladder, kidney, liver, lung, mouth / pharynx / larynx, esophagus, pancreas, prostate, stomach and womb. For these cancers, it was estimated that 34% of cases in the US and 39% of UK cases were preventable through the said steps. This implied that there was more room for improvement in these countries.

Zooming in, it was also estimated that more than 40% of breast and bowel cancer cases in developed nations could have been prevented in the same way.

And the abovementioned figures had not even taken into account the detrimental effects of smoking, which on its own is believed to be the main cause of about one-third of all cancers.

The report had been put together by a panel of 23 experts. Their study had been based on 10 recommendations released by the WCRF in 2007 on preventing cancer; those included daily exercise, avoiding processed meats, eating less salt, and keeping healthy weight. To arrive at the estimates, the team had looked at the biggest and most reliable research studies available which covered the 10 factors.

“This report shows that by making relatively straightforward changes, we could significantly reduce the number of cancer cases around the world,” said Michael Marmot, the chair of the panel.

Importance of Dietary and Lifestyle Factors in Cancer Prevention

The possible causes of cancer were discussed earlier. What is clear about cancer is that it is certainly not an alien-like ailment which descended from the sky and invaded our bodies, against which we can do nothing for protection or recovery. “People think that somehow cancer comes from heaven, or Darwin, or from their parent’s genes, but that’s not always the case. A third are caused by smoking, and approximately a third are related to diet and physical activity,” Marmot also said.

And scientific backing seems to be increasing. “The evidence linking diet, physical activity, obesity and cancer has become stronger over the last decade and this report can play a part in people adopting healthier lifestyles. After not smoking, it is clear that diet, physical activity and weight are the most important things people can do to reduce their cancer risk,” said Mike Richards, the National Clinical Director for Cancer.

Holistic Action is Needed

The experts have called for urgent action, especially in view of the escalating sedentary and obesity epidemics, graying populations as well as worsening food choices. “We are expecting a substantial increase in cancer rates with the ageing population, obesity rates soaring, and with people becoming less active and increasingly consuming highly processed and energy dense foods and drinks. The good news is that this is not inevitable,” said Martin Wiseman, the project director.

But it is also quite clear that a holistic solution involving many parties will be needed if society is to stem the cancer epidemic. “There is no magic bullet, no one single fix to the problem. If we are to tackle the situation we need individuals, business and government to work together to encourage healthy lifestyles by promoting things like cycle lanes and food labeling,” said Richard Davidson from Cancer Research UK.

The panel’s report had put forth some 48 suggestions for improvement. Some include:

* Eating more fruits in place of unhealthy fatty foods.
* Consumers to check labels to ensure foods being bought are healthy.
* Lowering costs of healthy foods.
* Schools and workplaces to stop providing unhealthy foods and to encourage exercise.
* Cycling to work.
* Governments to require widespread walking and cycling routes to be put in place; this will facilitate physical activity.
* Improving access to sporting facilities.

Beyond Merely Prevention – Cancer Recovery

How about those who have already been diagnosed with cancer? Are such lifestyle and dietary changes too little, too late for them? Not according to a recent study conducted by researchers at Addenbrooke’s hospital in Cambridgeshire, which found that about 36% of men with aggressive prostate cancer could give planned surgery or radiotherapy a miss after making some basic dietary and lifestyle changes.

The changes, which included lowering salt intake, reducing alcohol consumption, eating larger amounts of oily fish, losing weight and undertaking moderate exercise, were able to inhibit or even totally stop their cancers’ progression.

As we search for complicated answers to the cancer riddle, we should not underestimate the powerful role of factors which have been with us throughout human history – dietary and lifestyle habits.

References

Clean living way to beat cancer (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7…)

Healthy meal, exercise cuts cancer risk (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/…)

Adopting a healthy lifestyle ‘helps cancer suffers after diagnosis’ (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/3…)

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Healthy Eating: Top Ten Food Additives to Avoid

Lisa Says: our bodies were not meant to be nourished by chemicals. period. Why do we think it’s not going to have an impact, EVEN IF there’s no government study yet? Do you need a government study to figure out what would happen if you put soda in your car’s gas [...]

Lisa Says: our bodies were not meant to be nourished by chemicals. period. Why do we think it’s not going to have an impact, EVEN IF there’s no government study yet? Do you need a government study to figure out what would happen if you put soda in your car’s gas tank?

Healthy Eating: Top Ten Food Additives to Avoid
March 13th, 2009 by Paula in Food, Red Tag Crazy, health, paula, red tag crazy blog
As you all know, if you have read my other blogs, I think that the most important thing to eating healthy is to fill your body with as much fresh foods as possible. Processed foods, aside from being loaded with sugar and salt, will also include a variety of various chemicals and additives. The more you free your body from having to deal with excess and foreign materials, the better it is able to function. Therefore, I have compiled a list of the top ten most dangerous additives to be on the look out for. Most of this information came from two articles I keep for reference (thus the numerous scientific terms!!).

1. Propyl Gallate:

This preservative, used to prevent fats and oils from spoiling, might cause cancer. It is used in vegetable oil, meat products, potato sticks, chicken soup base and chewing gum and is often used with BHA and BHT (see below)

2. BHA and BHT:

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are used similarly to proplyl gallate – to keep fats and oils from going rancid. Used commonly in cereals, chewing gum, vegetable oil and potato chips (and also in some food packaging to preserve freshness), these additives have been found by some studies to cause cancer in rats. If a brand you commonly buy uses these additives, look for a different brand as not all manufacturers use these preservatives.

3. Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

MSG is a flavor enhancer in many packaged foods, including soups, salad dressing, sausages, hot dogs (don’t even get me started on the evils of hot dogs), canned tuna, potato chips and many more. Many people have personally experienced varying degrees of ill affects from MSG including headaches, nausea, or vomiting after eating foods containing MSG. On a more serious side, some doctors believe there is a link between MSG (and artificial sweeteners) and sudden cardiac death, particularly in athletes, as well as excitotoxic damage (excitotoxins are a group of excitatory amino acids that can cause sensitive neurons to die). Sound bad? Well, what is even worse is that food companies have found a way to hide MSG in their ingredients! Although MSG is a chemical compound, it is derived from natural ingredients. Therefore, the FDA allows the food companies to label MSG as “natural flavorings”. This will usually be listed as the last ingredient in the description and may or may not include MSG! Look for your processed food items in a health food store where you can be sure the processed foods will be MSG (and trans fat) free.

4. Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)

This artificial sweetener is found in Equal and NutraSweet, along with products that contain them such as diet sodas, and other low-cal and diet foods. This sweetener has been found to cause brain tumors in rats as far back as the 1970’s, however a more recent study in 2005 found that even small doses increase the incidence of lymphomas and leukemia in rats, along with brain tumors. Some people, who are sensitive to aspartame, may also suffer from headaches, dizziness and hallucinations after consuming it. Be wary of labels that say “No Sugar Added!”. This usually means that the produce is using aspartame as the sweetener. Truthfully, you would probably be better off with the sugar!

5. Acesulfame-K

Acesulfame-K is an artificial sweetener that is about 200 times sweeter than sugar. It is used in baked goods, chewing gum, gelatin desserts and soft drinks. Two studies involving rats have found that this substance may cause cancer, and other studies to reliably prove this additive’s safety have not been conducted! When Acesulfame-K breaks down, it has been found to affect the thyroid in rats, rabbits and dogs.

Recent studies have shown that the artificial sugar substitutes used primarily in soft drinks may interfere with your body’s natural regulation system and result in your overindulging in other sweet foods and beverages! Nice, huh!!

6. Sodium Nitrate

Sodium Nitrate is used as a preservative, coloring, and flavoring in bacon, ham, hot dogs, luncheon meats, corned beef, smoked fish, and other processed meats. These additives can lead to the formation of cancer-causing chemicals called nitrosames which promote the growth of various cancers. It is no comfort to know that the USDA actually tried to ban the use of Nitrates in the 1970’s, but were preempted by the meat processing industry who rely on the chemical as a color fixer to make their meats more visually appealing. Nitrates are especially dangerous to expectant mothers, infants, and children where there can be a heightened risk of brain tumors to the fetus or child. Sadly, nearly all school lunch programs use products containing sodium nitrates. I would say that this is one of the most dangerous chemicals being used in the food market today and should be avoided at all costs!

7. Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil

The process used to make hydrogenated vegetable oil (or partially hydrogenated vegetable oil) creates trans fats, which promote heart disease and diabetes (and good old weight gain). The Institute of Medicine has advised that you should eat as little trans fat as possible (duh!). Anytime you see these ingredients on the label you should avoid them. Trans fats can be found in some margarines, vegetable shortening, crackers, candy, snack foods, cookies, baked goods, salad dressings, canned soups, bread and much much more! It is used by the food industry because it reduces cost and increases the shelf life and flavor stability of foods. Check with your local health food store for trans fat free options.

8. Blue 1 and Blue 2

Blue 1, used to color candy, beverages (yes, those sport drinks), and baked goods may cause cancer.

Blue 2, found in pet food, candy and beverages, has caused brain tumors in mice.
9. Red 3 and Yellow 6

Red 3 is a food coloring that is used in cherries (fruit cocktails), baked goods and candy. It causes thyroid tumors in rats and may cause them in humans as well.

Yellow 6 is the third most often used food coloring and is found in baked goods, candy, gelatin and sausages. It has been found to cause adrenal gland and kidney tumors, and contains small amounts of many carcinogens. (carcinogen refers to any substance that is directly involved in the promotion of cancer).

10. Potassium Bromate

This additive is used in breads and rolls to increase the volume and produce a fine crumb structure. Although most bromate breaks down into bromide, which is harmless, the bromate that does remain causes cancer in animals. Bromate has been banned throughout the world EXCEPT for in the United States and Japan! (yes, it is even banned in Sri Lanka and China). In 1991 instead of banning the harmful additive, the FDA decided (without much success) to urge bakers to “voluntarily” stop using it. In California, however, a cancer warning would likely be required if it were used, which is why it is rarely used in that state (Hurray for California!!).

In conclusion, try to remember one thing when you are shopping and looking at the labels. No matter what the packaging promotes, bottom line is that food companies are in the business of making money. They are not concerned about your health, or your family’s health. They just want to sell a product regardless of how, as long as they fall within the FDA guidelines (which, as you have seen, are not limiting enough!). You have to be your own healthy food advocate. As much as you are able, buy organic, purchase as many items as possible through a health food market where many of those food companies are attempting make a better and healthier product, and eat as many fresh and unprocessed foods as you can! Happy Eating.

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Setting Up the Ideal Pantry for the Mediterranean Diet

Rex Says: Helpful hints similar to what we did to make lifestyle changes after I decided to treat my cancer naturally. AS EVER, please let us know if you’d like some help on developing an individual plan @ hungerforhealth@verizon.net. Remember, You’re not in this alone.
“Setting Up the Ideal Pantry” excerpted from What [...]

Rex Says: Helpful hints similar to what we did to make lifestyle changes after I decided to treat my cancer naturally. AS EVER, please let us know if you’d like some help on developing an individual plan @ hungerforhealth@verizon.net. Remember, You’re not in this alone.

“Setting Up the Ideal Pantry” excerpted from What Would Jesus Eat by Dr. Don Colbert.

The ideal pantry for eating the way Jesus ate would include these general good items:

BREAD: Select whole-grain breads or whole-grain pita bread. If you are allergic to wheat, choose millet bread or brown rice bread (available at most health food stores)
CEREAL: Choose GoLean soy cereal, all Bran, Fiber One, Shredded Wheat, Grape Nuts, Natural Granola (without added sugar), old-fashioned oatmeal (not instant), or Oat Bran. If you are allergic to wheat, try millet cereal or any gluten-free whole-grain cereal.
CHEESE: Choose parmesan (freshly grated or in a block you can grate yourself), part skim mozzarella, or feta cheese. If you are sensitive or allergic to dairy products, choose soy cheese. I recommend organic cheeses.
EGGS. Choose free-range eggs
FISH. Choose fish with scales and fins. Avoid catfish and shellfish. Make sure that your fish is fresh and that is comes form unpolluted waters.
FRUIT. Fresh is best. Frozen is acceptable. Avoid canned fruit packed in syrup.
HERBS AND SPICES. Many Mediterranean recipes call for garlic powder, parsley, Celtic Salt (available at most health food stores) and black powder. Experiment with herbs and spices – they are a great way to add flavor to your cooking without adding fat or sugar.
MEAT. Choose free-range meat. Avoid pork.
MILK. Choose skim milk and skim milk yogurt or cottage cheese. Soy milk, rice milk, and almond milk are good choices if a person is sensitive or allergic to dairy products.
NUTS.. Almonds and walnuts are preferred nuts. Keep nuts sealed in the bags after they are opened, and tore them in your refrigerator or freezer.
OLIVE OIL. Choose extra virgin or virgin olive oil
PASTA. Choose whole-grain pasta products. If you are allergic to wheat, try spelt or rice pasta.
POULTRY. Choose chicken and turkey, preferably white-meat portions.
SOUPS AND BROTHS. Choose low-sodium, low-fat, natural soup broths (available at health food stores) that are low in food additives.
STARCHES. Other than pasta, choose brown rice or wild rice, beans, legumes, lentils, coarse cornmeal or polenta, and potatoes (fresh, never instant)
SWEETS. Stock a little honey. Consider using Stevia (a natural food source that is very sweet an can be readily add to foods instead of artificial sweetener). It is good for diabetics and has no harmful side effects. You may also want to have a little naturally sweetened fruit spread (no sugar added)
VEGETABLES. Choose fresh or frozen. Low-sodium canned vegetables are acceptable on occasion. Choose especially from these vegetables: asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, peppers, olives, onions, spinach, tomatoes,
Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, collard greens, kale squash, turnip greens, and zucchini. Choose dark green lettuce such as romaine lettuce over iceburg lettuce, which does not have nearly as many phytonutrients.
VINEGAR. Choose balsamic, red wine, or apple cider.
WINE. Choose red.
YOGURT. Choose plain, skim or low fat
Remember always – what you bring home from the store is what you have available to eat. If you don’t bring junk food home, you won’t eat junk food at home

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Making The Change to a Mediterranean Healthstyle

Lisa Says: This was very much a part of our lifestyle change after Rex was diagnosed. It’s intimidating at first so starting with one or two things at a time is PERFECTLY OK. At least start getting the chemical cuisine out of what you eat – there are many natural alternatives for [...]

Lisa Says: This was very much a part of our lifestyle change after Rex was diagnosed. It’s intimidating at first so starting with one or two things at a time is PERFECTLY OK. At least start getting the chemical cuisine out of what you eat – there are many natural alternatives for snacks but BEWARE and READ THE LABEL. See our post on “Top 10 food additives and what they do to your body”.

“Making The Change to a Mediterranean Healthstyle” excerpted from What Would Jesus Eat by Dr. Don Colbert

1. Eliminate all processed foods from your cupboards, and start over. Toss all potato chips, corn chips and other snack foods with hydrogenated fat, cookies, cakes, candies, crackers, high-sugar cereals, white bread, highly processed foods, and high-sugar foods.
Also toss all oils other than olive oil, including any salad dressings, lard, Crisco, and other products that have hydrogenated fat.
Begin to buy only whole-grain food items and fresh fruits and vegetables.
Stock your shelves with olive oil, nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

2. Cook and bake with whole-grain products. Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, beans, legumes, and nuts.

3. Substitute olive oil for butter, margarine, salad dressings and other oils. Avoid all fried or deep-fried foods.

4. Limit cheese intake to small amounts of parmesan or feta cheese (used on main dishes or salads). Do not eat block cheese.

5. Eat low fat, plain yogurt, add fruit, and sweeten with Stevia (a natural substitute for sugar that has no harmful side effects).

6. Choose fish and poultry over red meat, and eat meat sparingly.

7. Cut out sugary sweets.

8. Enjoy a glass of red wine with lunch or dinner.

9. Exercise regularly – walk more.

10 Make dining an experience that you enjoy with others. Slow down your eating, savor your food, and enjoy sharing life with family and friends.

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6 Ways to Eat Healthy For Cheap

By Rachel Wharton
You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat healthy meals. Here are some simple rules-of-thumb that match good nutrition with tight budgets—for a double win.
1. Plan Meals Ahead Our grandmothers strategized for the week with a detailed shopping list, says Faye Griffiths-Smith, a family economist with the University of Connecticut [...]

By Rachel Wharton

You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat healthy meals. Here are some simple rules-of-thumb that match good nutrition with tight budgets—for a double win.
1. Plan Meals Ahead Our grandmothers strategized for the week with a detailed shopping list, says Faye Griffiths-Smith, a family economist with the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension. Try it, and you’ll see why: Not only can you save money, but you can avoid high-calorie impulse buys, too. One idea: Roast a lower-cost whole chicken; use leftovers in sandwiches.
2. Use Meat as a Seasoning “We eat too much meat,” says Lisa Sasson, a professor of nutrition and food studies at New York University, noting that meat can be more expensive per ounce and higher in calories than vegetable proteins. Instead of making meat the focal point of a dish, “use it more as a condiment,” she says.
3. Bring on the Beans Beans and whole grains like barley “are super-duper healthy and very cheap,” Sasson says. She adds these protein-packed extras to her salads, soups, and pasta to make them more filling.
4. Be Your Own Sous Chef Many people buy precut and preseasoned side dishes to save time, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, a registered dietitian and author of The Flexitarian Diet. But portioning and flavoring food yourself instead of buying premade mixes is cheaper. Not only that, the homemade version will have fewer calories, less salt and fat, and no additives.
5. Buy Seasonally and Locally What’s in season and grown closer to home is fresher and healthier, says Jackson Blatner—but that doesn’t mean you need a farmer’s market. Even grocery chains and superstores get deals on the fruits and vegetables in their area, and they pass on the savings in the produce aisles. Ask your produce manager for tips.
6. Rethink the Drinks What’s the easiest way to cut calories and costs? Don’t buy beverages, Sasson says. Make your own iced tea at home, or drink water, adding a wedge of fruit.

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Beans and Rice

Lisa Says: ever since Rex went to the Verbo orphanage in Nicaragua last year, he loves beans and rice. We eat this at LEAT once a week now. Here’s my version.
Beans and Rice
3 cups organic beans (red, black, pinto, etc). Soak at least 8 hours (overnight, while at work, whatev). Rinse.
6 cups [...]

Lisa Says: ever since Rex went to the Verbo orphanage in Nicaragua last year, he loves beans and rice. We eat this at LEAT once a week now. Here’s my version.

Beans and Rice
3 cups organic beans (red, black, pinto, etc). Soak at least 8 hours (overnight, while at work, whatev). Rinse.

6 cups water
1 tablespoon organic chicken bouillon paste (we use “Better Than Bouillon” base)
1 large onion chopped
4-5 chopped garlic cloves
Cracked pepper to taste.

Combine beans and rest of ingredients all in a pot and slow boil until beans are soft. Serve with organic brown rice for a nutritious and INEXPENSIVE meal. Beans and rice are a complete protein and contain all the amino acids. Nutritionally, beans are high in protein but require the rice to become a complete protein.

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CBS Evening News Living Cancer-Free February 26, 2009

After Rex’s great news about his labwork this week, we were stunned, and thrilled, with yesterday’s mainstream media coverage of the largest international cancer report to date.
“Fat Causes Cancer” In the landmark report that was released this week, research is mounting that fat causes cancer. Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard School of Public [...]

After Rex’s great news about his labwork this week, we were stunned, and thrilled, with yesterday’s mainstream media coverage of the largest international cancer report to date.

“Fat Causes Cancer” In the landmark report that was released this week, research is mounting that fat causes cancer. Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard School of Public Health states, “Simply being overweight and obese is a very important cause of the high cancer rates we have.”
67% of Americans are now estimated to be overweight, that cancer is more preventable in the US than anywhere in the world, and almost 350,000 cases of cancer in America can be avoided annually with weight control, exercise and diet (fresh and whole foods).

HOWEVER, Dr. Larry Norton of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clarifed WHY fat causes cancer. ” We are causing many of our cancers. Having fat in our bodies, fat produces estrogen and other hormones but also stimulates inflammation and that imflammation may be the link between obesity and cancer.”

Rex’s natural treatment of his cancer revolved around this basic scientific fact. Cancer cells grow in a low oxygen, or acidic, environment (pH out of balance). Acidic pH levels cause inflammation (which is the basis of illnesses like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer). Being overwight causes acidic pH levels. This mainstream international report is now finally stating what others already know. This is the tip of the iceburg. Being overwieght is obviously not the only reason someone would develop cancer (chemicals in our daily lives such as cleaning and personal care products also have this estrogen/inflammatory effect on the body), but it clearly shows that it’s about the body being out of balance, and WE HAVE CONTROL by focusing on your body being IN balance as it was designed to be, to not just be disease free, but to flourish.

To view the news clip, (only 2 min) select Living Cancer-Free at http://www.aicr.org/site/PageServer?pagename=res_policy_report#news

Peace,
Lisa

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