Tag Archives: organic

Baby Carrots can be harmful?

Lisa Says:  This was a compelling article from WorldTruth.TV forwarded by Dr. Kim Balas, NP. When the carrots are given a chlorine bath, it doesn’t have to be listed because it’s part of manufaturing and not considerend an ingredient.  Read on…
Why Baby Carrots Are Killing You  
Source:  Angela Garrison    thealternativedaily
What could I possibly have against these [...]

Lisa Says:  This was a compelling article from WorldTruth.TV forwarded by Dr. Kim Balas, NP. When the carrots are given a chlorine bath, it doesn’t have to be listed because it’s part of manufaturing and not considerend an ingredient.  Read on…

Why Baby Carrots Are Killing You  

Source:  Angela Garrison    thealternativedaily

What could I possibly have against these cute little “healthy” snacks that can be found in school lunchboxes across America? It’s back to school time and baby carrots are one snack to keep out of your child’s lunch.

It may shock you that baby carrots do not come out of the ground that way. There is no little baby carrot garden where these are harvested. Manufactured baby carrots are a result of taking all the broken and “ugly” big carrots they can’t put in the package, grinding them all up, processing them into the “baby” carrots and giving them a bath in chlorine to give them a bright happy orange color. There are also “Cut & Peel” baby carrots that are whittled into a miniature form. Continue reading »

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“Dirty Dozen’s” Produce list apparently dirtier than thought

Lisa Says: As we kick off the 100 Mile Food Challenge for SE Virginia/NE NC this week (connecting people with their local food sources), CNN is reporting that the original list of the 12 produce items with the highest pesticide residue from the Environmental Working Group apparently has even more pesticides than expected. This [...]

Lisa Says: As we kick off the 100 Mile Food Challenge for SE Virginia/NE NC this week (connecting people with their local food sources), CNN is reporting that the original list of the 12 produce items with the highest pesticide residue from the Environmental Working Group apparently has even more pesticides than expected. This is on the heels of the President’s Commission’s long term study and recent announcement of the link between chemicals and diseases, such as cancer.

Another great reason to enjoy local, healthy foods from farmers that use sustainable agriculture. Find your closest local food sources at www.localharvest.com or email us at Rex@HungerForHealth.com.  Enjoy the article.

‘Dirty dozen’ produce carries more pesticide residue, group says -
By Danielle Dellorto, Senior Medical Producer
June 1, 2010 1:31 a.m. EDT   CNN.com

Is enough being done to protect us from chemicals that could harm us? Watch “Toxic America,” a special two-night investigative report with Sanjay Gupta, M.D., June 2 and 3 at 8 p.m. ET on CNN.

(CNN) — If you’re eating non-organic celery today, you may be ingesting 67 pesticides with it, according to a new report from the Environmental Working Group.

The group, a nonprofit focused on public health, scoured nearly 100,000 produce pesticide reports from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to determine what fruits and vegetables we eat have the highest, and lowest, amounts of chemical residue.

Most alarming are the fruits and vegetables dubbed the “Dirty Dozen,” which contain 47 to 67 pesticides per serving. These foods are believed to be most susceptible because they have soft skin that tends to absorb more pesticides.

“It’s critical people know what they are consuming,” the Environmental Working Group’s Amy Rosenthal said. “The list is based on pesticide tests conducted after the produce was washed with USDA high-power pressure water system. The numbers reflect the closest thing to what consumers are buying at the store.”

Click here for the rest of the article and news video

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Farmers Cope With Roundup-Resistant Weeds

Lisa Says: As predicted by many, concerns about pesticide use on our food supply (and run off into our waters) is now resulting in weds that are resistant. “Just as the heavy use of antibiotics contributed to the rise of drug-resistant supergerms”. Many farmers such as Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms are living [...]

Lisa Says: As predicted by many, concerns about pesticide use on our food supply (and run off into our waters) is now resulting in weds that are resistant. “Just as the heavy use of antibiotics contributed to the rise of drug-resistant supergerms”. Many farmers such as Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms are living examples of how sustainable agriculture works effectively. Remember, we ‘vote’ with every food dollar we spend for what we will accept, and won’t, to nourish us. We have the power so choose wisely !

Farmers Cope With Roundup-Resistant Weeds

By WILLIAM NEUMAN and ANDREW POLLACK
Published: May 3, 2010 NY TIMES
DYERSBURG, Tenn. — For 15 years, Eddie Anderson, a farmer, has been a strict adherent of no-till agriculture, an environmentally friendly technique that all but eliminates plowing to curb erosion and the harmful runoff of fertilizers and pesticides.
But not this year.

On a recent afternoon here, Mr. Anderson watched as tractors crisscrossed a rolling field — plowing and mixing herbicides into the soil to kill weeds where soybeans will soon be planted.
Just as the heavy use of antibiotics contributed to the rise of drug-resistant supergerms, American farmers’ near-ubiquitous use of the weedkiller Roundup has led to the rapid growth of tenacious new superweeds.

To fight them, Mr. Anderson and farmers throughout the East, Midwest and South are being forced to spray fields with more toxic herbicides, pull weeds by hand and return to more labor-intensive methods like regular plowing.

Here is the link to the rest of the article….

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The 7 foods experts won't eat

Lisa Says: Mainstream is even now suggesting not to eat certain foods that we happened to change in our own lifestyle to address Rex’s cancer naturally. REST ASSURED we most certainly still eat everything on this list – just the organic, free range, wild caught or chemical free varieties. Enjoy the article from Prevention magazine.
The [...]

Lisa Says: Mainstream is even now suggesting not to eat certain foods that we happened to change in our own lifestyle to address Rex’s cancer naturally. REST ASSURED we most certainly still eat everything on this list – just the organic, free range, wild caught or chemical free varieties. Enjoy the article from Prevention magazine.

The 7 foods experts won’t eat
* by Liz Vaccariello, Editor-in-Chief, PREVENTION, on Tue Nov 24, 2009 11:15am PST

How healthy (or not) certain foods are—for us, for the environment—is a hotly debated topic among experts and consumers alike, and there are no easy answers. But when Prevention talked to the people at the forefront of food safety and asked them one simple question—“What foods do you avoid?”—we got some pretty interesting answers. Although these foods don’t necessarily make up a “banned” list, as you head into the holidays—and all the grocery shopping that comes with it—their answers are, well, food for thought:

1. Canned Tomatoes

The expert: Fredrick vom Saal, PhD, an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A

The problem: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity (a prominent characteristic of tomatoes) causes BPA to leach into your food. Studies show that the BPA in most people’s body exceeds the amount that suppresses sperm production or causes chromosomal damage to the eggs of animals. “You can get 50 mcg of BPA per liter out of a tomato can, and that’s a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young,” says vom Saal. “I won’t go near canned tomatoes.”

The solution: Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings), such as the brands Bionaturae and Coluccio. You can also get several types in Tetra Pak boxes, like Trader Joe’s and Pomi.

14 worst health mistakes even smart women make.

2. Corn-Fed Beef

The expert: Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming

The problem: Cattle evolved to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. More money for cattle farmers (and lower prices at the grocery store) means a lot less nutrition for us. A recent comprehensive study conducted by the USDA and researchers from Clemson University found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease. “We need to respect the fact that cows are herbivores, and that does not mean feeding them corn and chicken manure,” says Salatin.

The solution: Buy grass-fed beef, which can be found at specialty grocers, farmers’ markets, and nationally at Whole Foods. It’s usually labeled because it demands a premium, but if you don’t see it, ask your butcher.

25 ridiculously healthy foods you should be eating now.

3. Microwave Popcorn

The expert: Olga Naidenko, PhD, a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group,

The problem: Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize—and migrate into your popcorn. “They stay in your body for years and accumulate there,” says Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.

The solution: Pop natural kernels the old-fashioned way: in a skillet. For flavorings, you can add real butter or dried seasonings, such as dillweed, vegetable flakes, or soup mix.

Your nutritional guide to grocery shopping.

4. Nonorganic Potatoes

The expert: Jeffrey Moyer, chair of the National Organic Standards Board

The problem: Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. In the case of potatoes—the nation’s most popular vegetable—they’re treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. “Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won’t,” says Moyer, who is also farm director of the Rodale Institute (also owned by Rodale Inc., the publisher of Prevention). “I’ve talked with potato growers who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals.”

The solution: Buy organic potatoes. Washing isn’t good enough if you’re trying to remove chemicals that have been absorbed into the flesh.

14 ways to make veggies less boring.

5. Farmed Salmon

The expert: David Carpenter, MD, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany and publisher of a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish.

The problem: Nature didn’t intend for salmon to be crammed into pens and fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers. As a result, farmed salmon is lower in vitamin D and higher in contaminants, including carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides such as dioxin and DDT. According to Carpenter, the most contaminated fish come from Northern Europe, which can be found on American menus. “You can only safely eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer,” says Carpenter, whose 2004 fish contamination study got broad media attention. “It’s that bad.” Preliminary science has also linked DDT to diabetes and obesity, but some nutritionists believe the benefits of omega-3s outweigh the risks. There is also concern about the high level of antibiotics and pesticides used to treat these fish. When you eat farmed salmon, you get dosed with the same drugs and chemicals.

The solution: Switch to wild-caught Alaska salmon. If the package says fresh Atlantic, it’s farmed. There are no commercial fisheries left for wild Atlantic salmon.
Delicious and easy fish recipes

6. Milk Produced with Artificial Hormones

The expert: Rick North, project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society

The problem: Milk producers treat their dairy cattle with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST, as it is also known) to boost milk production. But rBGH also increases udder infections and even pus in the milk. It also leads to higher levels of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor in milk. In people, high levels of IGF-1 may contribute to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. “When the government approved rBGH, it was thought that IGF-1 from milk would be broken down in the human digestive tract,” says North. As it turns out, the casein in milk protects most of it, according to several independent studies. “There’s not 100% proof that this is increasing cancer in humans,” admits North. “However, it’s banned in most industrialized countries.”

The solution: Check labels for rBGH-free, rBST-free, produced without artificial hormones, or organic milk. These phrases indicate rBGH-free products.
Don’t be fooled by these 11 health food imposters.

7. Conventional Apples

The expert: Mark Kastel, former executive for agribusiness and codirector of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods

The problem: If fall fruits held a “most doused in pesticides contest,” apples would win. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. As such, apples don’t develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. But Kastel counters that it’s just common sense to minimize exposure by avoiding the most doused produce, like apples. “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers,” he says. And increasing numbers of studies are starting to link a higher body burden of pesticides (from all sources) with Parkinson’s disease.

The solution: Buy organic apples. If you can’t afford organic, be sure to wash and peel them first.

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The Organic Advantage: A Nutritional Edge

Rex says:  Moving to organics after my cancer diagnosis was a no-brainer for us.  The majority of our food supplies are genetically modified foods (GMO’s) and chemically and pesticide laden, how is that what our body was designed to not just function, but flourish on?   We don’t eat EVERYthing organic (see the Dirty Dozen [...]

Rex says:  Moving to organics after my cancer diagnosis was a no-brainer for us.  The majority of our food supplies are genetically modified foods (GMO’s) and chemically and pesticide laden, how is that what our body was designed to not just function, but flourish on?   We don’t eat EVERYthing organic (see the Dirty Dozen List) but most.

by Stephanie Whited (see all articles by this author)

(NaturalNews) A recent UK government report found that chickens raised in the widespread, non-organic fashion, have a 23.4% chance of being contaminated with salmonella, a bacteria responsible for food poisoning. The chance of an organic flock having salmonella? Only 4.4%.

What’s the difference between how the chickens are raised?

Organic chickens must have “access to outdoor ranges and pasture, with an emphasis on enabling the animals to express their natural behaviour.” Sounds pretty reasonable.

The non-organic chickens are mostly housed in cages which allow each individual bird the space of a standard sheet of paper. Yes, the 8 1/2″ X 11″ kind. These birds are also given antibiotics, which not only help to create superbugs and weaken the birds’ immune systems, but they potentially have the same effect on you when you eat the chicken or its eggs.

So, non-organic animals are likely to be raised under harsh conditions and administered antibiotics and hormones (the run-off of which create mutated fish), but what about non-organic fruits and vegetables?

Non-organic fruits and vegetables are grown with synthetic pesticides and fertilizer. So what? Well, studies are showing that more than 90% of children in the US “have detectable residues of at least one neurotoxic pesticide in their urine.” Something is called neurotoxic when it is poisonous to your brain and nervous system.

Pesticides may also be changing our hormones and reproductive systems. They’ve been found to change the hormones of animals in tests and in the wild, and a lot of our systems are similar, so aren’t they probably hurting us too? Visit Mindfully.org for more details.

How can we avoid them? According to a study outlined in a 2003 Environmental Health Perspectives article, children “eating organic fruits and vegetables had six times lower levels of pesticide byproducts in their blood versus children eating conventional produce.

Anytime that pesticide is found on organic produce, it is either because pesticides have drifted from a nearby non-organic farm or the produce has been contaminated by “long-ago banned pesticides that linger in the environment.” So the effects of pesticide use are extremely long term!

Besides helping you to avoid dangerous pesticides, antibiotics, and hormones, choosing organics also supplies you with more nutrients. Those organically raised chickens we just discussed lay eggs which, according to a Mother Earth News, contain:

* 1/3 less cholesterol

* 1/4 less saturated fat

* 2/3 more vitamin A

* 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids

* 3 times more vitamin E

* 7 times more beta carotene

That’s a huge difference! Mindfully.org compared over 30 different studies and found that on average, organic food does have more nutrients than inorganic food. Organic food was found to be far superior in three areas: higher Vitamin C content, a lower content of carcinogenic nitrates and better protein quality (http://www.mindfully.org/Food/Organic-M…) . These are key areas to a higher immunity, avoiding cancer, and cell health. Protein is in every cell of the body!

Truth about the benefits of organic food is spreading. If organics are not in your area, you can use this list, compiled by the Environmental Working Group, which shows how many pesticides are likely to be on a given fruit or vegetable, so you can choose those with the least contamination (http://www.ewg.org/sites/foodnews/fulld…) .

While it is better to eat fruits and vegetables with pesticides instead of processed foods, those who eat organically will have a healthy advantage. Ask your local stores to buy organic!

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What is used on conventionally grown fruits and vegetables to prolong their shelf life?

from www.whfoods.com
There is no single practice that is used across the board to prolong the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. Prior to 1986, especially in salad bars, it was very common practice to prolong the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables with sulfites. However, in that year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration [...]

from www.whfoods.com

There is no single practice that is used across the board to prolong the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. Prior to 1986, especially in salad bars, it was very common practice to prolong the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables with sulfites. However, in that year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration determined that sulfiting agents were no longer “considered GRAS” (Generally Recognized As Safe) for use with “fruits or vegetables intended to be served raw to consumers or to be presented to consumers as fresh.” Dried fruits are still widely preserved in this way, however.

You’ve probably noticed more and more use of water sprays in grocery stores in recent years. These water sprays are not only designed to help maintain a look of freshness to the fruits and vegetables, but also to help preserve them from damage by microorganisms. It turns out that everyday, chlorinated water can help protect fresh fruits and vegetables from spoilage by bacteria and other organisms. This process also prolongs shelf life, since all we mean by “shelf life” is really prevention of spoilage. We don’t have a problem with prevention of spoilage through water spraying, provided you take the time to rinse the produce at home (preferably with filtered water, and using a natural bristle brush when appropriate).

For some foods, early harvest and controlled ripening is another means of extending shelf life. Controlled use of a ripening agent like ethylene is popular with foods like bananas and tomatoes. Instead of harvesting these foods at a fully ripe stage, harvesting is done early on, when the foods are still green. The unripened foods can be transported and prepared for sale without continuing to ripen and lose shelf life. Then at some point in time closer to actual sale, the ripening agent, usually ethylene, will be sprayed onto the foods to trigger ripening. In addition to bananas and tomatoes, many other foods can have their shelf life partly regulated in this way, including persimmons, mangos, avocados, and papayas.

Ethyene spraying is allowed by the National Organics Program for use on tropical fruit certified as organic, including banana, pineapple, and mango. We’ve read through the debate over this practice and believe that even though it’s not the most desirable production method for these foods, there is limited risk from a health standpoint and that organic bananas, pineapples, mangos, and other fruits ripened in this way can make nourishing additions to a meal plan. From an environmental standpoint, however, we’d like to see this practice changed over time.

There’s also waxing. Commonly waxed fruits and vegetables include apples, peaches, citrus fruits, cucumbers, tomatoes, and bell peppers. Wax coatings are used on fruits and vegetables to help prevent moisture loss, protect from bruising (during shipping and handling), and increase shelf life. Waxes are also said to help reduce greening in potatoes, but contrary to popular belief, waxes not only do not help reduce greening, but can actually increase potato decay by cutting down on gas exchange in and out of the potato.

When purchasing non-organic fruits and vegetables, you should ask your grocer about the kind of wax used even if you are going to peel the produce; carnauba wax (from carnauba palm tree), beeswax, and shellac (from the lac beetle) are preferable to petroleum-based waxes, which contain solvent residues of wood rosins. Yet, it is not just the wax itself that may be of concern, but the other compounds often added to it: ethyl alcohol or ethanol for consistency, milk casein (a protein linked to milk allergy) as “film formers,” and soaps as flowing agents.

Unfortunately, at this point in time, the only way we know of to remove the wax from non-organic produce is to remove the skin, as washing will not remove the wax or any bacteria trapped beneath it. If you choose to do this, use a peeler that takes off only a thin layer of skin, as many healthy vitamins and minerals lie below the skin.

Nonsynthetic waxes, including carnauba wax and beeswax, are currently permitted for use on certified organic fruits and vegetables. The National Organics Standards Board has also petitioned for shellac on citrus fruits, but this petition is still pending.

For more information on this topic, see:Everything I Need to Know About Organic Foods

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Eating Organic – More Cheaply !

from:   www.whfoods.com
http://us.f527.mail.yahoo.com/ym/ShowLetter?Search=&Idx=1&YY=34183&y5beta=yes&y5beta=yes&order=down&sort=date&pos=0&view=a&head=b
May 26, 2008When I get together with friends these days, the hot topic of conversation is the rising cost of food. Not since the 1970’s have we seen food prices soar to such extremes. Therefore, today I’d like to talk about the steps we can take to help lower our food costs and still [...]

from:   www.whfoods.com

http://us.f527.mail.yahoo.com/ym/ShowLetter?Search=&Idx=1&YY=34183&y5beta=yes&y5beta=yes&order=down&sort=date&pos=0&view=a&head=b

May 26, 2008When I get together with friends these days, the hot topic of conversation is the rising cost of food. Not since the 1970’s have we seen food prices soar to such extremes. Therefore, today I’d like to talk about the steps we can take to help lower our food costs and still enjoy the Healthiest Way of Eating.

  • Purchase locally grown produce that is in season. You not only save money on the distribution costs of food, you also will enjoy foods that taste better and are more nutritious. By buying from local farmers who often grow foods without the use of pesticides (but don’t go through the process of getting organic certification), you can also enjoy foods free of pesticide residues at less cost than purchasing them from your local market.
  • Avoid prepared produce such as pre-cut pineapples or melons. You pay extra money for these conveniences and their content of valuable nutrients like vitamin C drops soon after they are cut.
  • Watch for specials. When you are thinking of what to prepare over the next few days (or week) organize some of your meals around foods that are on special at your local market—even health food stores have special offers that can help save you money.
  • If you eat meat or poultry, replace some of it with a combination of beans and grains. Beans and grains provide you with complete protein and also serve as a rich source of minerals and dietary fiber. In our World’s Healthiest Foods Essential Guide book, you will find more than ten recipes featuring the use of beans.
  • Buy dried beans and whole grains in bulk.If you compare the price of dried beans in bulk to that of purchasing canned beans, you will see that preparing beans from scratch and buying them in bulk is a great way to save money. And it’s so easy! For example to see how to cook black beans just click and read the section on Tips for Preparing Black Beans. (All beans are cooked similarly, although times may vary. To be sure, check our write-up of the specific bean you want to cook for detailed instructions.) Grains, such as rice, are also less expensive when bought in bulk, and whole grains provide significantly more nutrients than more costly “instant” versions. Again, for cooking instructions, just check our write-up of the grain you wish to prepare.
  • Consider frozen fruits and vegetables. Frozen foods maintain much of their nutritional value and are often less expensive than fresh foods because they have a longer shelf life. They can be very convenient and a good alternative to fresh foods when the fresh variety is not available or is extremely expensive.
  • Prepare a shopping list. Shopping lists help keep you on track to purchase only the items that are necessary and that have the most nutritional value.
  • Consider planting your own organic garden. Seeds, even organic seeds, are cheap. The thrill of picking and enjoying the amazing fresh flavor of your own, home-grown lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, peas, zucchini, and herbs is priceless. Even if you live in an apartment, you can grow your own food; for example, you can plant herbs and tomatoes in pots, adding beauty to your windowsill or deck and much delight (and cost savings) to your meals.

As the USDA expects food prices to rise at abnormal rates for at least the next few years I hope these tips will help you save money as you continue to enjoy your Healthiest Way of Eating.

Have a wonderful week of healthy eating!

George

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The Whole Story About Whole Foods Market

Lisa Says:  buying locally (or growing it ourselves – it’s NOT rocket science) and eating seasonally is a priority for us this year on our journey to wellness.
ARTICLE from http://articles.mercola.com
Many organic food fans trust stores that sell largely organic produce. However, the merger of Whole Foods and Wild Oats may be a sign that it’s [...]

Lisa Says:  buying locally (or growing it ourselves – it’s NOT rocket science) and eating seasonally is a priority for us this year on our journey to wellness.

ARTICLE from http://articles.mercola.com

Many organic food fans trust stores that sell largely organic produce. However, the merger of Whole Foods and Wild Oats may be a sign that it’s time for the rose-colored glasses to come off.

It is growing harder to make the case that shopping at Whole Foods is socially commendable. Whole Foods has faced well-deserved criticism for its effects on the environment, and its employees.

Whole Foods is an “industrial organic” company that has done away with the local distribution that was the center of the 1960’s back-to-nature movement. There is nothing environmentally friendly about Whole Food’s practice of importing asparagus in from Argentina in January.

Whole Foods is also the second largest union-free food retailer, right behind Wal-Mart. Whole Foods has taken the position that unions are not valid.

Many of Whole Foods’ canned or boxed items contain MSG, even though it is on Whole Foods list of unacceptable food ingredients. Their dairy products may or may not contain rBGH.

Whole Foods is a Fortune 500 Company that owes its allegiance to its shareholders. It is exploiting a niche market, and has now cleared the field of major competitors, leaving it free to raise prices and reduce quality.

Sources:
  • Natural News March 25, 2008
  • Dr. Mercola’s Comments:
    Whole Foods, the largest premium natural and organic supermarket chain in the United States, first entered into a merger plan with its chief rival Wild Oats in February 2007. Their plans were halted by the Federal Trace Commission (FTC) at the time, who contended that the merger violated federal antitrust laws by eliminating the substantial competition between the two close competitors. They also said it would give Whole Foods unilateral market power resulting in higher prices and reduced quality, service and choice for consumers.

    Well, money spoke the loudest again, it would seem.

    Certainly, Whole Foods Market has helped bring organic healthy and unprocessed foods to the mainstream market, but, like most large corporations, it will have to contend with its shareholders, even if that means cutting corners here and there in order to make a profit.

    Are Large Corporations Friend or Foe in the Organic Market?

    The creation of the organic market niche is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, the involvement of large corporations has turned organic food into a $16-billion business, with sales growing by as much as 20 percent per year. What this means for many Americans is access to more organic foods, likely at lower prices.

    Large corporations also have big advertising budgets, which means the idea of eating foods free from pesticides, genetically modified ingredients and raised in sustainable, humane ways is getting a lot of publicity, whereas just a couple of decades ago it was next to unheard of.

    The downside, however, might outweigh the benefits.

    Because as soon as big corporations dip their hands into a project, it automatically becomes about maximizing profits by churning out the largest amount of product for the least expense. If this means sacrificing some ethics and skimping on some quality, that’s a price they’re willing to pay.

    As a result of organic going mainstream in national super-chains such as Wal-Mart and Whole Foods, the term “organic” has virtually lost its meaning, and it is no longer a guarantee that the food is any better for either you or the environment.

    You can now buy organic versions of ice cream, potato chips, crackers, soda and just about anything else, but these foods are STILL not good for you; they’re still junk foods with little or no real nutritional value. And, from an environmental aspect, at least one study has found that the transportation of organic produce causes an environmental impact large enough to cancel out any environmental benefits.

    So, when you take all these factors into account, buying local is often better than buying organic, because you get fresher foods that didn’t use up excess fuel to be transported long distances. They’re also likely to be somewhat less expensive since the rising fuel costs inevitably get passed down the line to the end consumer.

    How to Get Your Money’s Worth When Shopping at Whole Foods Market

    A 2007 Money Magazine article highlighted the problems of Whole Foods Market and gave several pointers to keep in mind, so you don’t end up spending your whole paycheck on not-so-great foods. Among them:

    • Whole Foods offers only a limited supply of local produce, meaning the environmental damage it causes in transportation is just as high as most other supermarkets. Even in summer months, only 30 percent of the produce in your average Whole Foods store is grown locally. On the upside, they’re clearly labeled, which can help you in your purchasing decisions.
    • Although Whole Foods doesn’t carry products with trans fats or artificial coloring, everything else is fair game, including MSG and rBGH, so being a vigilant label reader is still a necessity. For a great resource on how to find hidden MSG, please see the website www.MSGMYTH.com for detailed listings.
    • The in-store prepared foods do list ingredients, but there’s no nutritional information provided.

    It remains to be seen whether Whole Foods’ CEO John Mackey holds true to his word to develop a new multi-tiered system for rating organic farms and meat producers this year, as he discussed it with Michael Pollan in February 2007. Mackey said he’d like to create more transparency in the food chain, which he believes could become the basis of a new national system.

    Why and When to Buy Organic

    Conventionally grown food is often tainted with a multitude of chemical residues, including chemical fertilizers, insecticides, and herbicides. These pesticides can cause a wide variety of health problems, including:

    • Neurotoxicity
    • Disruption of your endocrine system
    • Cancer
    • Immune system suppression
    • Male infertility and miscarriages in women

    However, you can easily overspend on purchasing organic now that everyone is jumping on the organic bandwagon, so let me give you some tips on how to prioritize your spending.

    Meats and Poultry — Since animal products tend to bioaccumulate toxins, concentrating them to far higher concentrations than are typically present in vegetables, it would make sense to make sure all your meat choices are organic.

    When choosing organic beef, you should also go the additional step and make certain the cows are grass-fed exclusively, especially the three months before they are slaughtered, as this is when they are typically given grains to fatten them up.

    For chickens, it would be important to make sure they are cage-free, or free-range, chickens.

    Fresh produce – When it comes to produce, buying local may be more important than buying organic since freshness is so very important. You’re better off buying fresh, vibrant, conventionally grown produce than wilted organic.

    As a side note on this issue, I am currently in the process of examining some VERY interesting technology that can destroy all the pesticide residue on produce in less than a second. It is really amazing, relatively inexpensive and may become a virtual necessity for all of us. I hope to report on this by the end of the year.

    That said, organic produce has been shown to have a much higher nutrient-content than conventional fresh produce, which should be a pretty good motivator to locate organic produce that has also been grown locally. On average, conventional produce has only 83 percent of the nutrients of organic produce.

    Personal care products –  As reported in the article above, many personal care products contain ingredients listed on Whole Foods’ unacceptable food ingredients’ list. Remember: if it’s not safe to eat, it’s not safe to put on your skin either as it is absorbed directly into your blood stream.

    An additional concern that was recently raised by the Organic Consumer’s Association is that a whopping 50 percent of “natural” and “organic” products were found to be contaminated with 1,4 Dioxane – a petrochemical carcinogen. The results of their testing of 100 “organic” personal care products are listed on their website and worth checking out to make sure you’re actually getting what you think you’re paying for.

    The only way to ensure your personal care product is truly organic is to look for the USDA Organic seal, which certifies that it complies with organic standards and is free of petrochemicals.

    Essentially, although you may spend more money on organic food and personal care products, your payoff of good health should more than make up for it – and reduce your health care costs in the future.

    It makes sense to me to invest a little bit more now so I can avoid paying LARGE hospital bills later on, but more importantly, I can avoid the disability and dysfunction from not being healthy. (If you don’t believe me on this one you simply must see the video of Michael J. Fox to show you what is possible if you consistently violate this principle.)

    Where to Buy Organic and Locally-Grown Food

    To assist you on your way to Taking Control of Your Health, here are some great resources to help you obtain wholesome food that supports not only you, but the environment as well. Combined with the tips on how to prioritize your spending, these resources can help you to put the very best food money can buy on your table.

    Farmers’ Markets

    • Farmers’ Markets — www.ams.usda.gov/farmersmarkets
      A national listing of farmers’ markets.
    • Local Harvest — www.localharvest.org
      Find farmers’ markets, family farms, and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area.
    • Eat Well Guide: Wholesome Food from Healthy Animals — www.eatwellguide.org
      The Eat Well Guide is a free online directory of sustainably raised meat, poultry, dairy, and eggs from farms, stores, restaurants, inns, and hotels, and online outlets in the United States and Canada.
    • Chicago’s Green City Market — Chicago’s only sustainable market with the highest quality locally farmed products. May through October. (Wednesdays and Saturdays, 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.)

    Community Supported Agriculture programs (CSA’s)

    • Alternative Farming Systems Information Center, Community  Supported Agriculture (CSA) — http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/csa/
    • Weston A. Price Foundation — www.westonaprice.org
    • FoodRoutes — www.foodroutes.org
      The FoodRoutes “Find Good Food” map can help you connect with local farmers to find the freshest, tastiest food possible. On their interactive map, you can find a listing for local farmers, CSA’s, and markets near you.
    • Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA) — www.buylocalfood.com

    Grass-Fed Beef Ranchers

    Related Articles:

    The Selling of Organic

    Which Giant Corporation Owns Your Favorite Organic Food Brand?

    Cracking Down on Organic Food Fraud

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What do you do when you can't buy organic?

Lisa Says:  we’ve started to grow our own veges because: 1. we know what we put on it (nothing) and 2. it’s SO CHEAP and 3.  there truly is personal satisfaction – it’s a “soul soother”.  We actually got an indoor grow light so that we can have a few things off season such as [...]

Lisa Says:  we’ve started to grow our own veges because: 1. we know what we put on it (nothing) and 2. it’s SO CHEAP and 3.  there truly is personal satisfaction – it’s a “soul soother”.  We actually got an indoor grow light so that we can have a few things off season such as cucumbers (VERY alkalizing).

article from www.whfoods.com

At the World’s Healthiest Foods, we are strong supporters of organic farming, and we encourage you to purchase organically-grown foods whenever possible. But what should you do when it’s not possible to buy organic? Here are some recommendations when you can’t buy organic:

  1. Make sure you’ve exhausted all of your local options. Check farmer’s markets, community-supported farms, even roadside food stands. Locally-grown foods may or may not be lower in pesticides and other contaminants, but it’s easy enough to ask and you may be surprised how many local growers you’ll find within driving distance and how close to organic some of their foods may turn out to be. Sometimes local growers simply don’t have the money to fund an organic certification process, even though they practice organic techniques in the way they grow their crops.
  2. Talk to your local grocers. You may be surprised at their willingness to experiment with new foods, particularly if you are a patron of the store. In addition, ask questions about their non-organic produce and meats. These foods may turn out to be very different in terms of their quality. What information does the buyer have from the supplier? Can the buyer get more information? Could you contact the supplier yourself?
  3. Shop online. Three sites that offer a variety of organic foods are: http://www.shopnatural.com, http://www.shopbyorganic.com, and http://www.oraganic.com/default.asp.
  4. Read the ingredient lists on all non-organic food packaging. Although you cannot trust the terms “natural” or “all natural” on the front of the package, you can trust the ingredient lists to include most of the substances added to the food. Look for the terms “artificial flavor” and “artificial color.” Also look for the FD&C colorings (for example, Yellow 5). Of course, you won’t find pesticides, heavy metals, or other potentially toxic residues listed on ingredient lists. But watching out for other potential toxins is still very worthwhile.
  5. Rinse your produce thoroughly and use a vegetable brush to help remove potential toxins found on the surface of the food. If you don’t have a water filter installed on your kitchen sink, consider installing one so that your rinse will involve drinking water of high quality. For green leafy vegetables, consider soaking for several minutes in water or water and a small amount of lemon juice before rinsing.
  6. Peel all waxed fruits. Also peel any fruits you know or suspect to be heavily sprayed.
  7. Continue to use all of the other World’s Healthiest Foods principles in your food selection. For example, continue to choose 100% whole grain products, even when they are not organic. Similarly, continue to choose cold pressed olive oil, lean meats, cold water fish, and a wide variety of natural spices and seasonings.
  8. Enjoy the delicious flavors and textures of your food. Even when you haven’t been able to buy organic, take satisfaction in the selections you’ve made and recognize the benefits of nutrient-dense, minimally processed foods, one-of-a-kind foods!

WHFoods

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Consumer Alert: Natural products contaminated with cancer chemical

From: insider@naturalnews .com(NaturalNews)
NaturalNews / NewsTarget Insider Alert (www.NaturalNews. com)
newsletter
Dear NaturalNews / NewsTarget readers,
This is a NaturalNews consumer alert:
Yesterday morning, the Organic Consumers Association announced it had
found the cancer-causing chemical 1,4-dioxane in about half of the
so-called “natural” and “organic” consumer care products it tested,
including brands like Jason, Alba, 365 and many others.
NaturalNews was there at the press [...]

From: insider@naturalnews .com(NaturalNews)

NaturalNews / NewsTarget Insider Alert (www.NaturalNews. com)
newsletter

Dear NaturalNews / NewsTarget readers,
This is a NaturalNews consumer alert:

Yesterday morning, the Organic Consumers Association announced it had
found the cancer-causing chemical 1,4-dioxane in about half of the
so-called “natural” and “organic” consumer care products it tested,
including brands like Jason, Alba, 365 and many others.
NaturalNews was there at the press conference, and we actually recorded
the entire press conference and posted the audio for you at:
http://www.naturaln ews.com/Index- Podcasts. html

We’re also interviewing the Organic Consumers Association’ s Executive
Director, Ronnie Cummins, later today and we’ll be posted that interview
as soon as possible.

Our feature story today reveals the full extent of the study, and it
lists the actual product brand names you should now avoid. We also list
the actual ingredients to watch out for on the labels of personal care
products, including so-called “natural” or “organic” products.

This is a must-read report for anyone wishing to protect themselves (and
their families) from cancer-causing chemicals in “natural” and “organic”
products. Please forward this to a friend, family member or co-worker
who needs to know this information.

Please note that there ARE safe products in the natural category.
They’re listed in the story, too (see first link, below). They include
companies like Dr. Bronner’s. Read the story to find out which products
were found to be free from contamination with 1,4-dioxane.

Health: Natural Consumer Products Found Contaminated with Cancer-Causing
1,4-Dioxane in Groundbreaking Analysis Released by OCA
A cancer-causing compound called 1,4-dioxane has been found in some of
the most commonly used petroleum-based cosmetics by a study commissioned
by the Organic Consumers Association, including products from Kiss My
Face, Nutribiotic, Jason, Ecover, Citrus…
http://www.naturaln ews.com/022846. html

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