Tag Archives: savvy shopping

Japanese Woman: Skinnier but not Healthier

Lisa Says: This is a great example of “skinny” does not necessarily equal “healthy”. In America’s concern over the obesity explosion and subsequent chronic diseases, we need to understand that the opposite extreme is exactly that – extreme. Look to balance the body and your health. Here is the article from the Washington Post.
Big in [...]

Lisa Says: This is a great example of “skinny” does not necessarily equal “healthy”. In America’s concern over the obesity explosion and subsequent chronic diseases, we need to understand that the opposite extreme is exactly that – extreme. Look to balance the body and your health. Here is the article from the Washington Post.

Big in Japan? Fat chance for nation’s young women, obsessed with being skinny
By Blaine Harden
Washington Post Foreign Service
Sunday, March 7, 2010
TOKYO — As women in the United States and across the industrialized world get fatter, most Japanese women are getting skinnier.

Still, many view themselves as overweight.

“I am quite fat, actually,” said Michie Takagi, a 70-year-old grandmother and retired clothing store executive. She has a body mass index (BMI) of 19.9, which is at the thin end of normal. While the average American woman has gained about 25 pounds over the past 30 years, Takagi has gained 4.5 pounds, typical for her age cohort in Japan, according to U.S. and Japanese government figures.

Skinnier still are Japanese women younger than 60, who were thin by international standards three decades ago and who, taken as a group, have since been steadily losing weight.

The trend is most pronounced among women in their 20s. A quarter-century ago, they were twice as likely to be thin as overweight; now they are four times more likely to be thin. For U.S. women of all ages, obesity rates have about doubled since 1980, rising from 17 percent to 35 percent.

Social pressure — women looking critically at other women — is the most important reason female skinniness is ascendant in Japan, according to Hisako Watanabe, a child psychiatrist and assistant professor of pediatrics at the Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo.

“Japanese women are outstandingly tense and critical of each other,” said Watanabe, who has spent 34 years treating women with eating disorders. “There is a pervasive habit among women to monitor each other with a serious sharp eye to see what kind of slimness they have.”
Public health experts say that younger Japanese women, as a group, have probably become too skinny for their own good. Restricted calorie consumption is slowing down their metabolisms, the average birth weight of their babies is declining, and their risk of death in case of serious illness is rising.

“I would advise these women to eat when they are hungry,” said Satoshi Sasaki, a professor of preventive epidemiology at the University of Tokyo School of Public Health. “They should be satisfied with a normal body.”

Fatter men and children

Japan has long been the slimmest industrialized nation, thanks, in part, to a diet that emphasizes fish, vegetables and small servings. But what makes people fat around the world — sedentary workplaces, processed food and lack of exercise — is also making many Japanese fat.

Adult men and children of both sexes are gaining weight at a pace that worries the government. A quarter-century ago, 20 percent of men in their 50s were overweight; now, 32 percent are.

Attempting to head off heart disease and other obesity-related illnesses, the government imposed waistline standards in 2007, requiring girth measurements at work-funded physical examinations and encouraging the rotund to diet and exercise.

Doctors say that for men, who are gaining weight in all age groups, the program makes considerable sense but that for adult women, it sends exactly the wrong signals. “The issue of skinny ladies is being overshadowed,” said Sasaki. “Middle-aged women have the mistaken view that they are all getting fat.”

Sakiko Ohno, a cosmetics wholesaler in Tokyo, is one of those worried women. She is 40 and has a BMI of 19.5 — low, but still in the normal range.

“I think I am very fat,” Ohno said repeatedly during an interview. “If I have a Starbucks muffin, that night I will skip rice and have vegetables.”

‘The critical eye’

Ohno, who is single, said women pay attention to their weight because Japanese men prefer petite women and because fashionable clothes are sized for thin women. “But the real reason why women want to be thin is so they can look at themselves in the mirror and compare themselves to other women,” she said.

Researchers have found that Japanese women in urban areas are significantly thinner than those in rural areas. In their first year of college, the weight of young Japanese women falls, unlike that of American women, which increases.

“When population density is high, women are busy checking out body weight,” Watanabe said. “They want other people to be fatter than themselves. It is complicated, competitive and so subtle. The critical eye is ubiquitous.”

Japanese government data show that since 1984, all age categories of women from 20 to 59 have become more thin (BMI of less than 18.5). The percentage of those women who are overweight (BMI over 25) has declined, as well. Women in their 60s have neither gained nor lost weight. The only group of women that has become slightly more overweight is those 70 and older, and that increase is about 2 percent.
Studies in Japan have found little evidence that rates of serious eating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia, are higher in Japan than in the United States or Europe. But government-funded research studies have shown that many women of child-bearing age have a misconception of what it means to be overweight, with up to 40 percent saying that a normal BMI measurement of 20 or 21 looked fat to them.

Those studies have also found that daily calorie consumption among young women was often two-thirds of the average adult’s actual energy intake. Smoking rates among women in their 20s nearly doubled in the 1990s, jumping from 10 to 20 percent.

As in the United States and elsewhere, Japanese women are bombarded by media images of gorgeous, very thin women — and public health experts say they believe those images have played a substantial role in increasing pressure on Japanese women to be skinny.

The American response to such media images puzzles many people in Japan.

“In the United States, you see all these beautiful skinny people on television, and yet Americans keep getting fatter anyway,” said Sasaki, the public health expert at Tokyo University. “Why is that?”

Special correspondent Akiko Yamamoto contributed to this report.

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No Shortcuts to Health

Lisa Says: The Virginian Pilot printed my letter to the Editor today (copied below) in response to the front page article that ran 2/25 on “America’s ‘queen of coupons’”.
Virginian Pilot 12 March 2010 | 5:00 AM
No shortcuts to health
Re ‘Grocery coupon queen,’ front page, Feb. 25: The report shows the disconnect in understanding what gets us [...]

Lisa Says: The Virginian Pilot printed my letter to the Editor today (copied below) in response to the front page article that ran 2/25 on “America’s ‘queen of coupons’”.

Virginian Pilot 12 March 2010 | 5:00 AM
No shortcuts to health

Re ‘Grocery coupon queen,’ front page, Feb. 25: The report shows the disconnect in understanding what gets us ’sick’ and how to save real money.

Americans need to choose between saving pennies at the grocery store and promoting chronic disease or saving thousands in medical care and enjoying robust health.

The article lists items clinically shown to promote such issues as diabetes, obesity and cancer, and shortsightedly promotes using these products and lowering your food budget, while medical costs are bankrupting you.

But you can eat healthy foods you enjoy and save money at both the grocery store and the doctor’s office. With a little research, you can learn to stretch your food dollar with healthier choices.
Lisa G Hamaker, Co-Director, Hunger For Health
Virginia Beach

Here’s the original article that ran. ‘Nuff said.

America’s ‘Coupon Queen’ shares her supermarket savvy
By Carolyn Shapiro
The Virginian-Pilot
© February 25, 2010

Susan Samtur stands in the cereal aisle and calculates.

A box of MultiGrain Cheerios normally costs $3.69. Harris Teeter supermarket has them on sale: two boxes for $5, or $2.50 each. Samtur has a coupon for 75 cents off, which the store will double, for a savings of $1.50. Her final price is $1.

The self-described “Coupon Queen,” who has written books on her grocery-shopping strategies, stopped Wednesday in Hampton Roads to demonstrate her skills at the Harris Teeter in north Suffolk. Up and down the aisles, she consults her coupon filing system, which her mother helped her make decades ago, as well as her shopping list and the store’s latest advertising flyer.

“This is another good one,” she says, heading toward the crackers. “They have the Ritz on sale for $2.99.”

Her coupon will take an additional $2 off the crackers with a purchase of any Coca-Cola product, so her cost for the Ritz comes to 99 cents. “I’ll always use Ritz crackers,” she explains. “I use them for crust when I’m baking.”

Her Harris Teeter visit is on Samtur’s East Coast supermarket tour. While preaching her gospel of grocery savings, she hopes to promote her fourth book, due this fall. On her Web site, she sells subscriptions to her quarterly magazine, Refundle Bundle, and a DVD called “Supershopping with the Coupon Queen,” which comes with an envelope of coupons worth $25 for the shipping price of $6.95, to cover costs, she says.

Samtur, 65, is a petite purchasing powerhouse, standing well under 5 feet. She has big eyes and a bigger Bronx accent, from her childhood in the New York City borough. A resident of Scarsdale, N.Y., her supermarket of choice at home is A&P.

Coupon competency requires preparation. Before shopping, Samtur says, she spends a half hour preparing a list, studying the store’s weekly flyer and comparing it against her pile of coupons to find the steepest discounts. For Harris Teeter, she also checked the chain’s Web site and other sources of online coupons. Some supermarkets don’t accept those, but Harris Teeter does.

Good coupon shoppers, Samtur says, must dispense with brand loyalty. They must forgo favorites for the best deal. In certain categories, such as laundry detergent, she has coupons for as many as 10 brands “because I don’t know what’s going to be on sale.”

In the dairy case, she gets six of Dannon’s Light & Fit yogurt cups Wednesday for 15 cents each. Harris Teeter had marked them down to 10 for $4, or 40 cents each. Samtur had a coupon for 75 cents off six, and Harris Teeter doubles coupons up to 99 cents. So that’s $2.40 in yogurt cups, less $1.50 with her coupon, for six for 90 cents.

Samtur grows excited about a can of Edge shaving gel on sale for $1.99. She has a 75-cent coupon, doubled for a savings of $1.50. “For 49 cents, where are you going to get a brand-name shaving cream?” she says.

She talks a mile a minute, scanning the shelves for sale prices and deals. Her keen eye catches freebies and value-added pitches that most shoppers would ignore.

She notices packages that say “20 percent more!” of a product for the same price as the usual size. She spots “free DVD” on a box of cereal – for five box “tokens,” the shopper can choose from a number of movies. She points out instant coupons attached to product packages, an offer of “free bananas” on a box of Nilla Wafers cookies, and a Tropicana orange juice carton that pitches “up to $15 savings.”

Samtur takes advantage of most of these deals. “Sometimes there are offers where you send away a part of your package and you get coupons back.”

Many of those coupons are for free items – no strings attached or other purchase required. Samtur’s file includes several of these. At Harris Teeter, she gets a $5.19 box of Cascade dish detergent and a $7.49 container of Folgers coffee – each for the price of a 44-cent stamp.

When Samtur reaches the cash register at Harris Teeter, she has a cartful of items culled from her list and a pile of coupons to match. While on tour, Samtur doesn’t actually buy the groceries. The store, which approves her visit ahead of time, returns items to the shelves and gives back her coupons.

The cashier rings her up at $156.93, including the savings from her VIC (Very Important Customer) frequent-shopper card, which gives her the in-store discounts. Then the store manager scans her coupons.

Her final total: $35.82. She saved 77 percent.

“The longer you do it, the better you get at it,” Samtur says, promising that any consumer can excel at coupon use. “It’s not like I have some special or unique gift.”

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The "Dirty Dozen" and "Clean 15" of Fruits and Vegetables

Lisa Says:
This link to Good Morning America covering the research on pesticides on produce shows that mainstream media is recognizing the frustration of Americans with the status of our food supply and choices (or lack thereof) which directly impacts our health (or lack thereof). I’ve posted before about the Dirty Dozen but it’s nice [...]

Lisa Says:

This link to Good Morning America covering the research on pesticides on produce shows that mainstream media is recognizing the frustration of Americans with the status of our food supply and choices (or lack thereof) which directly impacts our health (or lack thereof). I’ve posted before about the Dirty Dozen but it’s nice to see what mainstream is reporting.

The “Dirty Dozen”

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=8315670&page=1

The “Clean 15″ Fruits and Vegetables

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=8315650&page=1

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More Non-Organic Foods Shed High Fructose Corn Syrup from Ingredients

Lisa Says: We consumers really do have power ! Rex and I have noticed this trend when we make our 10 minute grocery shopping trips. More and more products advertising High Fructose Corn Syrup FREE. Americans are starting to see what this lifestyle is doing to our health, and the health of [...]

Lisa Says: We consumers really do have power ! Rex and I have noticed this trend when we make our 10 minute grocery shopping trips. More and more products advertising High Fructose Corn Syrup FREE. Americans are starting to see what this lifestyle is doing to our health, and the health of our children, and we’re ‘voting’ with our wallets by buying healthier choices.

More Non-Organic Foods Shed High Fructose Corn Syrup from Ingredients
by Frank Mangano, citizen journalist
See all articles by this author
Email this author

(NaturalNews) If you`ve been roaming the aisles of your local grocery store recently, you`ve probably noticed an encouraging trend that we`re seeing more and more of lately. On food products not traditionally associated with natural foods that make spaghetti sauces, pizza crusts and whole wheat breads are big banner headlines that read, “Now without High Fructose Corn Syrup.”

Is this a sign of things to come?

Whether more companies follow or not is unknown, but this is a very encouraging trend in the meantime. So often, people unfamiliar with what makes a food natural see a loaf of bread that says “Whole Wheat” or a cereal that says “Whole Grain” and believe it`s natural. And why shouldn`t they? Health advocates in the media have emphasized the importance of eating foods that are whole wheat or whole grain, so food makers and food consumers have taken notice. To a certain extent, this is good, as foods are now being made with whole grain flour instead of highly processed refined flour.

What isn`t so good, however, is that despite these foods being listed as “whole grain,” many remain loaded with high fructose corn syrup. And because the FDA still doggedly stands behind their belief that high fructose corn syrup is safe to consume, there`s really no need for these food companies to change how they make their breads, their spaghetti sauces or virtually everything and anything else that claims to be one thing but is really something else entirely. At least some companies are taking the dangers of high fructose corn syrup seriously.

Members of the Food and Drug Administration should take people like Natalie Rotunda seriously, a writer and “organic food examiner” for Examiner.com, whose daughter`s adverse reactions to foods were stopped dead in their tracks once high fructose corn syrup was eliminated from her diet. As Rotunda writes in a recent article of hers, “[My daughter] had no reactions to any other type of sugar, just HFCS. For others like me who have made such a connection, it`s all the proof we need to quit those foods and drinks that attack the delicate workings of our bodies and the bodies of those we love.”
But the adverse reactions to high fructose corn syrup extend far beyond Rotunda`s daughter. Study after study shows how high fructose corn syrup leads to obesity, due primarily to the fact that it suppresses the body`s release of a key hormone called leptin. When leptin is suppressed, the body is unable to convert sugar into energy, ultimately turning sugar into fat that`s packed away as storage rather than burned for energy. The latest study to corroborate this fact was one done by the University of Florida, released in September 2008 and published in the American Journal of Physiology.

The FDA may claim that high fructose corn syrup is safe to consume, but study after study shows links between HFCS and adult-onset diabetes (i.e. type II diabetes) and contributes to obesity. You`d think that`d be enough to reconsider their stance. Apparently not. But one thing`s certain: More and more people are taking notice of HFCS and the detrimental impact it has on health. If they weren`t noticing, food companies wouldn`t be labeling their products with labels like “No HFCS.” After all, consumers rule in this dour economic climate. The only way to get people to buy is for businesses to give people what they want.

Thankfully, food companies are finally glomming on to this fact. Let`s hope more follow in 2009 and beyond.

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6 Ways to Eat Healthy For Cheap

By Rachel Wharton
You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat healthy meals. Here are some simple rules-of-thumb that match good nutrition with tight budgets—for a double win.
1. Plan Meals Ahead Our grandmothers strategized for the week with a detailed shopping list, says Faye Griffiths-Smith, a family economist with the University of Connecticut [...]

By Rachel Wharton

You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat healthy meals. Here are some simple rules-of-thumb that match good nutrition with tight budgets—for a double win.
1. Plan Meals Ahead Our grandmothers strategized for the week with a detailed shopping list, says Faye Griffiths-Smith, a family economist with the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension. Try it, and you’ll see why: Not only can you save money, but you can avoid high-calorie impulse buys, too. One idea: Roast a lower-cost whole chicken; use leftovers in sandwiches.
2. Use Meat as a Seasoning “We eat too much meat,” says Lisa Sasson, a professor of nutrition and food studies at New York University, noting that meat can be more expensive per ounce and higher in calories than vegetable proteins. Instead of making meat the focal point of a dish, “use it more as a condiment,” she says.
3. Bring on the Beans Beans and whole grains like barley “are super-duper healthy and very cheap,” Sasson says. She adds these protein-packed extras to her salads, soups, and pasta to make them more filling.
4. Be Your Own Sous Chef Many people buy precut and preseasoned side dishes to save time, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, a registered dietitian and author of The Flexitarian Diet. But portioning and flavoring food yourself instead of buying premade mixes is cheaper. Not only that, the homemade version will have fewer calories, less salt and fat, and no additives.
5. Buy Seasonally and Locally What’s in season and grown closer to home is fresher and healthier, says Jackson Blatner—but that doesn’t mean you need a farmer’s market. Even grocery chains and superstores get deals on the fruits and vegetables in their area, and they pass on the savings in the produce aisles. Ask your produce manager for tips.
6. Rethink the Drinks What’s the easiest way to cut calories and costs? Don’t buy beverages, Sasson says. Make your own iced tea at home, or drink water, adding a wedge of fruit.

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: "Stocking Up Tips" From Organic Food Depot

Lisa Says: Some suggestions for saving on food costs from the Organic Food Depot where we shop. Rex got stuck on beans and rice (a combo that has all 16 amino acids) in Nicaragua last summer, so we have started buying beans in bulk and cooking red beans and brown rice at least once [...]

Lisa Says: Some suggestions for saving on food costs from the Organic Food Depot where we shop. Rex got stuck on beans and rice (a combo that has all 16 amino acids) in Nicaragua last summer, so we have started buying beans in bulk and cooking red beans and brown rice at least once a week. VERY delicious and SO inexpensive.

This is a little lengthy but interesting info about what they’ve experienced with food prices going up (and ‘best buy’ dates in #1 – I didn’t know that !). You can skim down to the suggestions if you like. Let me know if you need any seedlings for suggestion # 4 !

Peace,
Lisa

Lisa Hamaker, BA, CNHP

http://HungerForHealth.wordpress.com/

http://HungerForHealth.com/

Proverbs 3:5-8

“Stock” Tips for 2009
Many financial pundits are sporting newsletters these days suggesting the road to economic recovery will be long and difficult. Even our local Wachovia bankers think it will be the end of 2010 before we begin to see “daylight”.
The general advice, which seems prudent, is to conserve cash, get out of stocks and bonds, pay back debt and increase personal savings. Many will further suggest investing in gold and silver (although many of these are just stocks and no more secure than any other stock).

However, since you can’t eat gold or silver, we’d like to offer another low-cost investment strategy for these times: stock up on a little extra food.

For many years prior to 2008, we would receive 50 to 60 price increases from our suppliers at the beginning of each month. Then beginning in the spring of 2008 and extending throughout last summer, we were getting price increases for 500 to 600 items per month, 10 times the norm.

Prices appeared to stabilize around Thanksgiving and held more or less steady until recently when we noticed increases starting up again.

One idea we’ve heard is that last summer food manufacturers passed along price increases due mostly to the high cost of oil, until the economy slowed so much that people, shocked by the higher prices, quit spending money, leaving manufacturers with unsold inventory. Further price increases would not help so they absorbed the costs and held prices steady or even lowered prices until their inventory was gone by the end of the year. Now they mostly have a much smaller inventory onhand and are beginning once more to pass along their increased costs.

Another idea we’ve heard is that we’re seeing higher costs due to inflation and devaluation. Since early last year, there has been a sharp decline in the value of the dollar relative to currencies such as the Euro, and a good deal of organic food such as olive oil and pasta is imported from Europe.

Whatever the reason for the increases, they appear to be real and here to stay.

We are not, of course, financial wizards, nor making any predictions about “doom and gloom” scenarios or the end of the world as we know it, (though if that’s your cup of tea see “Food Scarcity And The Decline of Civilization”), but based on day-to-day observations, we do see prices steadily rising and want to suggest some strategies for using “food” as a good investment.

Here they are:

Buy a little extra food online though our website each week.
Shop for low prices. Buy your extra food online when it’s on sale.
Buy “bulk” for even greater savings.
Grow a garden this summer.
Consider Long Term Food Storage – i.e. having a 6 mo. or 1 yr. supply on hand
1. Buy a little extra food online though our website each week.
This is easy and doesn’t have to break your budget. You don’t need to stock up on lots of 50 lb. sacks of wheat (though if you want to, they will last a long time and are always a great value, especially if you have a grain mill for fresh flour).
Instead, think “small, but steady”, just like the tortoise and the hare. Add an extra 2 lb. bag of rice or an extra jar of honey to your order each week. Pick items which have a very long shelf life, e.g. rice, wheat, sugar, salt, flax seeds, raisins, etc. We just brought in 1 lb. bags of Shiloh Farms organic dried beans (Anasazi, Adzuki, Garbanzo, Kidney, Lima, etc.). If you have the space, you can freeze grains like wheat and oats for very long term storage.

Many foods today have a “best buy” date rather than an “expiration date”. That’s because, except for infant formula and some baby food, product dating is not generally required by Federal regulations. If there is a date, it doesn’t necessarily mean the food has gone bad or spoiled. Increasingly manufacturers are using shorter and shorter “Best Buy” dates on products to fool people into thinking the food has expired, forcing stores to take it off their shelves and buy more. In reality this ploy just means more sales for the manufacturer. It’s a game and to some degree a scam.

As an investment, if inflation gets much worse, you will have made money (or more accurately saved money) when you consume your (lower cost) food in the future. When prices jump suddenly, incomes don’t go up as quickly or by the same percent. Therefore, in the future, you could be spending a much larger proportion of your income to buy the same item(s), i.e. you will be buying in “inflated” dollars.

If inflation doesn’t get any worse, and prices stabilize, then you can order / buy a little less each week and use up your store of food if you want, or maybe just keep it for a “rainy day”.

Either way, you don’t lose anything, and might gain a significant advantage.

2. Shop for low prices. Buy your extra food online when it’s on sale.
Buying “on sale” makes your money go further. It typically saves an additional 10% to 25%, and if you think about it, there are very few investments these days which give a “guaranteed” return that high. As you know, shopping through our online system already saves you 15% over shopping in the store even when items aren’t on sale, but you save much more when they are!
Be sure to put items you might want into your personal catalog online. Then when any of them go on sale (and over 4,000 items are on sale each month), our system will send you an email so you can “stock up” on a little.

3. Buy “bulk” for even greater savings.
“Bulk” foods are much less expensive per unit cost than their smaller, prepackaged counterparts.
If you do want to buy larger quantities in “bulk” (remember you have to click the “bulk” checkbox on our website to see bulk items), find a friend or neighbor to split the quantity with you if you don’t want it all. Unfortunately, we have no facilities for splitting large bulk bags.

Online, there is an excellent selection of bulk items in 25 lb. bags, an easy to store, easy to handle, low cost option.

4. Grow a garden this summer.
It’s good exercise and gives an excellent return on invested time. Based on spring seed sales so far, the National Gardening Association predicts a 19 percent increase in home gardening in 2009.
It’s not terribly difficult to grow a garden. You need a spot which gets sun most of the day. Make sure you have access to water. You can start your own seeds in little plugs of peat moss or peat pots, then plant them when the weather warms up. If you don’t have the space, you can also buy small seedlings from home improvement centers like Lowe’s or Home Depot.

If you haven’t done it before, start small, don’t try to grow lots of everything, unless you like lots of squash. Only grow what you can tend.

There are numerous websites and books in the library which tell you how to do it. There’s even a series running in the Virginian Pilot showing how it can be done on an apartment balcony.

Seed catalogs are free, and a packet of seeds is inexpensive. One of our favorites is Park Seed Co. because they’re a Southern company and their varieties do well in our hot, humid summers. Another is Southern Exposure Seed Exchange which has a lot of heirloom and organic seeds.

Standard varieties are available locally in the big discount chains and home centers, with good selections of organic seeds this year, but don’t wait too long as the best varieties usually sell out quickly. Remember, this year lots of folks are thinking about growing a garden.

If you’re very successful and have a lot of food from your garden, you can give it to neighbors or preserve it through canning, drying or freezing for winter eating. One of our favorite books is “Putting Food By” by Janet Greene and Ruth Hertzberg. You can find it at the local library or online at booksellers like Amazon. Anyone interested in food preservation should have this book in their library.

5. Consider Long Term Food Storage – i.e. having a 6 mo. or 1 yr. supply on hand
Many families, especially members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, have long term food supplies equal to 6 months or even 1 year for their entire household.
Why would you want to consider this? Natural disaster, personal emergency, financial crisis or layoff, and helping others during crises are reasons which come to mind.

You might feel that building a long term food supply is so far beyond your means that you don’t think you should even make the effort. But it doesn’t have to be done all at once.

There are numerous websites which tell you how to start with a small one to three month supply and build from there if you want.

In general, the key is to start small, building up a one week supply, then expanding that to two weeks, and then to a month. Set a budget. Buy foods which you would normally buy anyway. If you have perishable items in your stock, rotate through those, eating and replacing them more often so they don’t go bad. And don’t forget water. You might not think of it as a “food”, but it’s awfully difficult to live without. Commercial bottled water in PET containers especially ozonated or with a high pH (e.g. Iceland Springs) tends to have a shelf life of 2 years or more if kept in a cool, dry place without sunlight.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS
So there you have our “stocking up” tips for 2009. They may not be glamorous, nor rival the “stock tips” you’d get from investors like Warren Buffet, but they will give you a solid, satisfying and tasty return on a very small investment of time and money.
Join us today in “stocking up” and “plant a seed” in others. Tell all your friends who you think might be interested as well. Help them sign up and teach them how our online ordering system works. We’re here to help everyone get the best possible food at the lowest possible price for health, and yes, prosperity too.

Thanks for being a member and helping us towards our goal.

Your friends at OFD
Genny, Jim, Cindy, Jamie and the rest of our great staff
Organic Food Depot(r)
Your Link To Healthy Savings(tm

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Four Basic Principles of Healthy Eating and Living

Rex Says: simple doesn’t necessarily mean easy. When we first started our lifestyle change to address my cancer naturally, it was frankly overwhelming at times. Yet, once I dealth with the mental blocks (I’d never done it before, I didn’t know how to do it), I just STARTED and little by little, it really [...]

Rex Says: simple doesn’t necessarily mean easy. When we first started our lifestyle change to address my cancer naturally, it was frankly overwhelming at times. Yet, once I dealth with the mental blocks (I’d never done it before, I didn’t know how to do it), I just STARTED and little by little, it really did become a habit, and it feels GREAT! If I can do it, ANYBODY can do it.

Friday, February 27, 2009 by: Mike Donkers, citizen journalist
(NaturalNews) Changing your diet isn`t always easy. The first thing you need to realize is that when you go off the western diet you will undergo a detoxification process that will be both physically and mentally challenging. The urge to go back to toxic foods will be almost impossible to resist and it will take tremendous discipline and will power to withstand. It`s important to keep these four principles in mind: water, raw plant food, full-spectrum salt and full fats.

Water

Coffee dehydrates. All stimulants do. Caffeine is a stimulant. In the morning your adrenals produce natural levels of the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline in order to jolt you awake and get you going for the rest of the day. This should be enough to do the trick. If you wake up not feeling refreshed and rested it means your immune system wasn`t able to finish the natural cleansing process it goes through every night and prefers to keep you asleep to finish the job. In other words, your immune system is compromised and you need more adrenalin and cortisol to kick-start your brain into action.

Coffee will do just that. So will the sugar and cream you put in it. These are all stimulants which drive up your blood sugar. The result is a response from your adrenals to produce higher levels of cortisol and adrenalin than usual because your body goes into survival mode. These are not the only two hormones which are produced in excess. Your pancreas will excrete higher levels of insulin than usual to try and bring back your blood sugar to normal levels. Do this for 20, 30, maybe 40 years and you`re setting yourself up for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, even neurological diseases such as MS, Parkinson`s etc.

Along with exhausted adrenals, an exhausted pancreas, and disturbed blood sugar and hormonal levels, you`re also seriously overtaxing your nerve system. This is why too much coffee causes your hands to shake. Another contributing factor is that these stimulants acidify your blood, which naturally has a pH of between 7.3 and 7.4. Not only that, water is drained from your cells which are forced to give up their fluids as well as glucose and minerals from your blood, muscles and tissue.

Do you understand now how much havoc that one cup of coffee with sugar and creamer wreaks in the morning just to get you through the day? And that`s just coffee! The typical western diet contains nothing but adrenal-depleting, blood-sugar upsetting, mineral-depriving, water-draining and alkaline-lowering stimulants: bread, pizza, cookies, soft drinks – it`s a miracle people are still alive! Most people are seriously dehydrated as a result of this. One of the first things you need to do is drink the amount of good-quality water (unfluorized, filtered water) your cells need on a daily basis. Drink 10 oz of water for every 20 lbs of body weight. Make sure you drink most of that water in the morning.

A good way to start the day is drinking lemon water (water with freshly squeezed lemon juice). This also helps detoxify the liver. Smoothies are a great way to get water in your system. Mike Adams has put together a nice little book with smoothie recipes:

http://www.truthpublishing.com/supe…

Another great way to bring more water to your cells is by eating foods that naturally contain lots of water, e.g. cucumber, water melon, green leafy vegetables. The importance of water is not to be underestimated and it`s the first step toward great health you need to take.

Raw Plant Food

Eat more salads! Organic raw plant foods are incredibly healthy, purifying and nourishing. Besides water they contain omega-3 fatty acids, chlorophyll, minerals, enzymes, proteins, and vitamins. They are nature`s complete foods and humans and animals alike thrive on them, including the meat eaters who get the plant nutrients secondhand through the meat. Make sure you eat at least one salad a day, preferably two, or even three!

Don`t worry about counting calories and don`t feel guilty about overeating because it`s almost impossible to overeat salads. That`s because they contain water and are not dense foods. They will make you lose weight but also mentally they will make you feel lighter. They are truly heart foods. Did you know that the number one heart mineral is magnesium and that chlorophyll is built around magnesium? Did you also know that chlorophyll is 98% identical to red blood cells? We are plants, and they are teachers who can elevate our consciousness.

An easy salad to make is grated carrots with green leafy vegetables, the darker green the better (try spinach!), sprouts and a dressing of olive oil with fresh lemon juice. Make sure you add some of the pulp as well. You can even eat the seeds, which are anti-candida and anti-cancer. If you want you can add a bit of paprika, cayenne pepper and oregano to your salad. Learn to appreciate the taste of bitter and sour, the two most underdeveloped tastes in your mouth, thanks to the conditioning you`ve undergone since childhood to appreciate only sweet and salt.

Full-Spectrum Salt

Just like there`s such a thing as full-spectrum light (natural sunlight which contains the full electro-magnetic spectrum) there`s also full-spectrum salt. Salt, too, is electro-magnetic energy. Your cells need these electrolytes in order to improve the electro-magnetic and even light communication between the cells. Take only these three types of salt: Celtic Sea Salt (aka sel gris, from Guerande, France), Dead Sea salt, or Himalaya salt.

The best way to consume the salt is in liquid form by making a concentrated salt solution called a Sole. This article explains how to do it:

http://www.naturalnews.com/023600.html

A safe dose is taking one or two teaspoons of Sole in a glass of water per day. You can up the dose gradually if you want, but be careful and listen to what your body is telling you. You don`t have to worry about your blood pressure or your heart as your body actually needs salt, lots of it. Your blood should naturally contain 0.9% of salt and your body needs about 7 dry oz of it. When you were in your mother`s womb you were in a salt bath which should have been very similar to diluted ocean water. Healthy human blood is 98% identical to ocean water. We are not only plants, we are also a diluted ocean. Thus it makes perfect sense to drink salt dilutions to regenerate our cells and give them back the original information and energy.

Full Fats

By full fats are meant full fats. Forget about calories and the fat-is-bad propaganda. Have you ever seen skimmed or low-fat milk coming out of a cow? That`s like saying nature has made a mistake and we`re correcting it by taking the fat out. Fat does not make you fat. Let`s repeat that: FAT DOES NOT MAKE YOU FAT.

Make sure you eat the right kind, though. They are easy to remember: only extra vergine organic coconut oil and olive oil, as well as real butter made from real milk. The most bioavailable forms of fat are saturated fats, as they have a short or medium chain. These are mostly animal fats, such as raw milk from organic, grass-fed cows with horns, butter and grass-fed, organic meat. Of course coconut oil is a great vegetarian saturated fat alternative. In second place are mono-unsaturated fats such as olive oil. These are more difficult to digest because of their longer chain but nevertheless really healthy.

As you may have noticed, in these four principles of healthy eating you don`t see grains anywhere. Mankind has been on this planet for some 200,000 years. We started farming only about 10,000 years ago. This means this `staple food` didn`t enter our diet until recently from an evolutionary perspective. The human digestive system was not meant to deal with grains. Ask yourself why there are so many people with gluten intolerances and allergies. Only birds are meant to eat grains. For us, it goes against, well, the grain.

The easiest way to integrate the four principles of healthy eating into your life is to live mostly on smoothies and salads. They allow you to combine the four principles. Smoothies and salads are also easy to take with you. Make sure each ingredient is organic, though. It literally pays for itself as you will feel more nourished while eating less. It`s food that feeds and not just fills.

If you stick to this food pattern you are giving your cells the energy and information they need to regenerate themselves. You will lose weight if you are overweight and gain weight if you are underweight. Your blood sugar and hormone levels will stabilize and so will your blood pressure and cholesterol. Your bowel, liver and heart function will improve and so will your immune and digestive system as a result. You will experience a noticeable increase in energy, vitality and health.

These are transformational foods which can help speed up our evolution because they are based on nature`s life-giving and life-promoting principles. All it takes is the mental strength, discipline and will power to go with your own flow rather than that of society. We are society, though. Allow these foods to open up your minds, hearts and souls and heal you at every level, and we can change society. As Ghandi said, be the change you want to see. All it takes is a few brave souls to set off this change. You could be one of them.

Sources:

Moritz, Andreas Timeless Secrets of Health and Rejuvenation, Ener-Chi Wellness Press, 2007
Wolfe, David The Sunfood Diet Success System, Maul Bros Publishing, 2006
Price, Weston A. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Keats Publishing, 2003

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Replace Sugar for Optimum Health

Lisa Says: as studies have shown sugar feeds cancer cells, one of the first things we did in addressing Rex’s cancer naturally was switch to natural sweeteners such as stevia and agave nectar, plus cut out the processed foods that HIDE so much of it ! Now I even grow stevia in my [...]

Lisa Says: as studies have shown sugar feeds cancer cells, one of the first things we did in addressing Rex’s cancer naturally was switch to natural sweeteners such as stevia and agave nectar, plus cut out the processed foods that HIDE so much of it ! Now I even grow stevia in my front yard.

Wednesday, February 25, 2009 by: Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist
NaturalNews) The average American eats between 90 to 180 pounds of sugar each year. That is a quarter to a half pounds each day for children and adults! Besides the typical culprits of desserts, doughnuts, and soda, sugar is also found in unexpected items like condiments and bread. Our consumption of sugar is deteriorating our health and increasing the numbers of diabetes, obesity, and many other chronic illnesses.

The typical effects of sugar are taught to us as children. Sugar can cause tooth decay by being used as a food source for the bacteria found on our teeth which causes plaque. In fact, the bacteria can actually turn the sugar into a glue which makes it harder to be washed away by saliva. Sugar also causes hyperactivity, crankiness, and difficulty concentrating in children as any parent can attest to! In addition to these well-known effects, sugar can also contribute to a decrease in immune function, increased cholesterol, overgrowth of yeast, gastrointestinal problems, premature aging, cardiovascular disease, and more. There are many detrimental health effects of sugar but fortunately there are some healthier alternatives.

Sugar is often replaced in foods by products that are either lower in calories or cheaper to produce including aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal), sucralose (Splenda), and high fructose corn syrup. These products also have detrimental side effects. Replacing sugar as well as these sugar alternatives with natural sweeteners will have a beneficial effect on health.

Agave nectar is one alternative that is used by health conscious consumers. Agave nectar comes from the same plant that tequila is made from. It has recently become recognized as a healthy alternative to sugar and artificial sugar substitutes. It is about 90% fructose but is completely natural unlike the processed fructose found in high fructose corn syrup. Another benefit of agave is that it has a low glycemic value (less than 30, compared to sugar which is in the 60’s.) A food that is low on the glycemic index is less likely to be converted to fat. Agave nectar is more calorie dense than sugar but because it is about forty times sweeter much less can be used to achieve the same level of sweetness.

Stevia is another natural alternative to sugar and sugar substitutes. It is an herb native to Paraguay that has been used for centuries as a sweetener. It contains no calories and no carbohydrates. In 2008 the FDA approved its use as a food additive, previously it was sold only as a dietary supplement. Stevia also does not raise blood sugar so is a good choice for diabetics.

Replacement of sugar in your diet can be difficult. Reducing intake of processed foods and replacing sugar with natural sweeteners will increase your well-being, health, and energy.

Sources:

76 Ways Sugar Can Ruin Your Health, Nancy Appleton, Ph.D., http://www.mercola.com/article/suga…

Questions and Answers About Stevia, David Richard, http://www.stevia.com/SteviaArticle…

All About Agave, http://www.allaboutagave.com/

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Fresh Vegetable Salads Provide Maximum Nutrition for Each Food Dollar Spent

Wednesday, February 25, 2009 by: Barbara Minton, Natural Health Editor
(NaturalNews) It looks like food prices will continue to creep steadily higher throughout 2009, even in the face of an economic crisis that has reduced the purchasing power of most Americans. This makes it more important that ever to get the best nutritional value for every [...]

Wednesday, February 25, 2009 by: Barbara Minton, Natural Health Editor
(NaturalNews) It looks like food prices will continue to creep steadily higher throughout 2009, even in the face of an economic crisis that has reduced the purchasing power of most Americans. This makes it more important that ever to get the best nutritional value for every food dollar spent. When it is time for lunch, one of the best overall values is a salad, whether it comes from a salad bar or is made at home. But not all salads offer good nutritional value. The ingredients chosen will determine whether the salad is an energy booster full of excellent nutrition to help you sail through the afternoon, or one that deadens cellular energy and provides very little nutritional value for the money spent.

Salads that offer the most nutrition for the money are made with fresh, unprocessed vegetables. Color is the key. Those veggies with the bright, vibrant colors are trying to tell you something. The more colors added to the bowl, the more the salad can keep you looking and feeling young, and put a bounce in your step for the rest of the day. That’s because vibrant colored veggies are loaded with antioxidants, plant compounds that slow the aging process and ward off disease.

Give your salad a solid foundation

Get your salad off to a good nutritional start by making a bed of leafy dark green vegetables. Lettuce is the traditional favorite, but stay away from the iceberg variety. Its lighter color gives it away as being low on nutritional value. Choose instead from romaine, green leaf lettuce, and spinach. Better yet, mix in some of each. Baby greens, sometimes called spring mix, are a good choice too.

All of these varieties are excellent sources of Vitamins A, E and K. Vitamin A supports eye and respiratory health, and makes sure the immune system is up to speed. It keeps the outer layers of tissues and organs healthy, and promotes strong bones, healthy skin and hair, and strong teeth. Vitamin E slows the aging process, maintains positive cholesterol ratios, provides endurance boosting oxygen, protects lungs from pollution, prevents various forms of cancer, and alleviates fatigue. Vitamin K keeps blood vessels strong and prevents blood clots.

Greens are also excellent sources of folate, manganese, chromium, and potassium. Folate prevents heart disease, defends against intestinal parasites and food poisoning, promotes healthy skin, and helps maintain hair color. Manganese keeps fatigue away, helps muscle reflexes and coordination, boosts memory, and helps prevent osteoporosis. Chromium helps normalize blood pressure and insulin levels. It prevents sugar cravings and sudden drops in energy. Potassium regulates the body’s water balance and normalizes heart rhythms. It aids in clear thinking by sending oxygen to the brain.

Other green veggies offering big nutritional bangs are broccoli, green peppers, parsley, zucchini, asparagus, cucumber, okra, arugula, and sea vegetables.

Pile on all the colors to stay looking and feeling young

Load up your salad bowl with yellow vegetables like carrots, yellow peppers, sweet potatoes, and yellow summer squash. These are super rich in beta carotene, and vitamins A and C. They are powerful free radical scavengers that prevent damage to cells. Free radicals are thought to be responsible for clogged arteries and heart disease, cataracts, blood vessel damage, inflammatory diseases and arthritis, asthma, and even cancer. Vitamin C plays a big role in the formation of collagen, which is important for the growth and repair of body-tissue cells, gums, blood vessels, bones, and teeth. It helps keep the skin young and supple so wrinkles don’t develop.

Purple cabbage, purple endive, and eggplant are rich in the phytonutrient anthocyanin, another type of flavonoid that fights the damage to cells that comes from daily living. Besides making the salad look absolutely gorgeous, purple cabbage is able to signal genes to increase production of enzymes involved in detoxification, the cleansing process that eliminates harmful compounds from the body. This means free radicals, carcinogens, and toxins are disarmed and cleared from organs and tissues. Studies have shown that people who eat the most cruciferous vegetables like purple cabbage and broccoli have a much lower risk of several cancers including breast cancer. These veggies promote gastrointestinal health, and a clean and healthy liver. They keep away ulcers, and even help prevent Alzheimer’s disease through the ability of anthocyanins to protect brain cells against the damage caused by amyloid-beta protein.

Be sure to include some red in the salad. Along with being rich in vitamin C, tomatoes provide high levels of the carotenoid lycopene, known for preventing and fighting prostate cancer. Coumaric and chlorogenic acids found in tomatoes help keep lungs healthy even in smokers by blocking the effects of carcinogenic nitrosamines found in cigarette smoke. The carcinogenic effects of eating meats preserved with sodium nitrates can be blocked by adding tomatoes. Beets are another great red choice. Throughout history they have been used to detoxify and build the blood. Beets are high in folic acid, iron, and calcium. They contain betaine, a compound that detoxifies the liver and protects the liver and bile ducts from free radical damage. Studies show betaine contributes to coronary and cerebral artery health, and shrinks tumors.

Other red veggies with big nutritional powers are radishes, red bell peppers, chili peppers, red onions, and radicchio.

Many white foods are wastelands of nutrition. Not so for veggies. Cauliflower has many of the nutrients of other cruciferous vegetables. Onions and garlic are considered super foods for their potent health benefits that include high amounts of sulfur that protect collagen and connective tissues. Sulphur helps keep joints working well and hair looking shiny and healthy. Onions are considered a prebiotic, meaning they feed the probiotic bacteria and yeast in the intestinal tract. Both onion and garlic are known for lowering blood sugar levels and fighting inflammation, as well as having strong antibiotic properties that can be used to fight infections. They lower high cholesterol and blood pressure, help prevent heart attack and stroke, reduce colon cancer risk, and halt tumor growth.

Other white foods that go great in a healthy salad are mushrooms, jicama, and daikon.

Chopped salad gives the digestive system a head start

Chopped salads are popular fare in many restaurants that cater to people looking for a healthy meal. Chopping salad ingredients into very small pieces adds taste appeal because some of each ingredient is available in every bite. This means that a bit of each sweet ingredient like carrots, bell peppers and beets is included in each forkful, and all the flavors of the salad are included with each bite.

Lunch is often eaten in a rush, and big chunks of veggies can make for an afternoon of digestive unease. Chopping a salad gives the digestive system a head start on its work of breaking down all the components and releasing their nutrients. It is a waste of food dollars to buy a salad and not get the full nutritional benefit it has to offer. Chopped salad fits nicely into the mouth and allows for adequate chewing, so necessary for complete digestion.

If the salad is made at home, each ingredient can be chopped into very small pieces as it is added. If the salad is from a salad bar, chances are the veggies will be in large chunks, since chopping salad requires extra labor. After you have filled your bowl, grab a knife and fork and start chopping. As the afternoon wears on, you will probably be glad you did.

How the salad is dressed makes all the difference

What you put on your salad is just as important as what you put in it. Most dressings sold in traditional and health food grocery stores are made with polyunsaturated oil, an oil that deadens cellular energy and promotes vitamin D deficiency by decreasing the ability of vitamin D to bind with D binding proteins. Polyunsaturated oils have been linked to a variety of diseases ranging from digestive disorders to cancer. Most of these dressings also contain the excitotoxin monosodium glutamate, a compound that tricks the brain into believing cheap ingredients taste really great. Monosodium glutamate is toxic to brain cells.

Instead of reducing the nutritional punch of a salad, increase it with a dressing made from extra virgin olive oil and lemon juice or vinegar. Fresh vegetables and olive oil are part of the basics of the anti-aging and longevity-enhancing Mediterranean Diet. Instead of deadening cellular energy, olive oil actually increases it through its antioxidant capabilities. Olive oil has been around for thousands of years. It contains monounsaturated fatty acids and has a health profile that is far superior to newcomer canola oil. Choose natural vinegars without the addition of preservative sulfites. Read the label before you buy. Raw apple cider vinegar is a good choice, or squeeze on some fresh lemon juice.

Add herbs, fresh chopped garlic if you like, and a good pinch of sea salt to the dressing and mix it well. Dressing made with olive oil is so health promoting that it should be added liberally to the salad. Mix it up until dressing coats every tiny piece and the salad glistens with goodness. The salt helps release the juices from the vegetables adding even more flavor to the dressing and increasing digestibility.

What to add and what to avoid

A salad made with a large bed of dark green leafy vegetables contains some protein and a good amount of amino acids. The protein content of a salad can be beefed up by adding seeds and nuts. One ounce of pumpkin seeds or almonds boosts protein content by nine grams. Seeds and nuts add extra nutrition power and crunchy taste.

Adding sprouts is another good way to increase protein. Alfalfa sprouts are 35% protein. Broccoli sprouts are 26% protein and provide super antioxidant power as well as compounds known to prevent and fight many cancers including cancer of the breast.

Beans are another super nutritious choice, providing additional protein and nutrient power. If the salad is made at home, dried beans that have been soaked and cooked can be used. Prepared beans sold in glass jars work well too. Canned beans should be avoided unless cans are free of bisphenol-A.

Leave out the animal protein. Studies are suggesting that the polyphenols in vegetables bind with animal protein, making them inaccessible to the body. Polyphenols are largely responsible for the disease fighting capabilities of vegetables, so maintaining their integrity is important. As for cheese, it tastes really great in a salad, but studies have shown conclusively that polyphenols bind with milk protein.

If you are a salad bar visitor, those prepared salads look really tempting, but they are best left out too. They contain mayonnaise or other energy deadening dressings made with polyunsaturated oils. Many of them also contain monosodium glutamate and preservatives.

For more information see:

http://www.newswise.com/articles/vi…

M. Bunning and P. Kendall, Health Benefits and Safe Handling of Salad Greens, Colorado State University.

Earl Mindell’s Vitamin Bible.

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