Tag Archives: weight loss

“South Beach Diet” guru issues “wake-up call”

Lisa Says: I saw this on CBS News and it was such common sense info, I had to post. Enjoy the video.

October 19, 2011 11:05 AM  “South Beach Diet” guru issues “wake-up call”

(CBS News) The South Beach Diet changed the way we lose weight. The original South Beach Diet was developed in 1995 [...]

Lisa Says: I saw this on CBS News and it was such common sense info, I had to post. Enjoy the video.

October 19, 2011 11:05 AM  “South Beach Diet” guru issues “wake-up call”

(CBS News) The South Beach Diet changed the way we lose weight. The original South Beach Diet was developed in 1995 by a cardiologist to help his cardiac and diabetic patients lose weight. The diet program replaced bad fats with healthy fats like nuts and oils and bad carbs with good carbs like those from vegetables, whole grains, and fruit.

But now  Dr. Arthur Agatston, who created that diet, says Americans are still gaining weight and getting sick from it. In his new book, “The South Beach Wake-Up Call,” Agatston issues a wake-up call and reveals his new strategy to turn your health around.   (Click here for video) Continue reading »

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What if You Ate Only What Was Advertised on TV?

Lisa Says: It will hopefully come as no surprise that if we only ate foods that were advertised on TV, TIME magazine reports that researchers have found “that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar.”   The issue is that [...]

Lisa Says: It will hopefully come as no surprise that if we only ate foods that were advertised on TV, TIME magazine reports that researchers have found “that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar.”   The issue is that “TV ads for food may be skewing our decisions on what we eat in powerful ways.”
QUESTION: So how influenced are you by advertising and the media?  Perhaps more than you realize?  Enjoy the article.

What if You Ate Only What Was Advertised on TV?

By Alice Park Wednesday, Jun. 02, 2010, TIME magazine

It should come as no surprise that the typical American diet isn’t exactly brimming with healthy goodness — rather, it’s laden with fat, sugar and salt. And now new research published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association points to a troubling reason: TV ads for food may be skewing our decisions on what we eat in powerful ways.

To figure out exactly how unhealthy a TV-guided diet would be, researchers studied food commercials that appeared during 84 hours of prime-time programming and 12 hours of Saturday-morning cartoons broadcast over the major U.S. networks during one month in 2004. When the research team calculated the nutritional content of a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet containing only foods that were advertised on television, they found that it exceeded the government’s recommended daily amount of fat by 20 times and had 25 times the recommended daily intake of sugar. “That’s almost a month’s worth of sugar in one day,” notes study leader Michael Mink at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Ga.
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Top 10 Most Hated Foods Kids Should Eat

Lisa Says: great article here on foods we should be eating but generally don’t because we THINK they don’t taste good (au contraire!). While at the national GreenFest in DC recently, we heard noted pediatrician Dr. Greene speak on food ‘imprinting’ which is how we got to eating the foods we do and how to [...]

Lisa Says: great article here on foods we should be eating but generally don’t because we THINK they don’t taste good (au contraire!). While at the national GreenFest in DC recently, we heard noted pediatrician Dr. Greene speak on food ‘imprinting’ which is how we got to eating the foods we do and how to get ourselves, AND KIDS, ‘retrained’ to eat tasty nutritious foods – but that’s the next post. Enjoy the article from Men’s Fitness magazine.
10 Most Hated Foods
And why you should be eating them right now

by Ryan McKee

http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/293

Children are expected to say things like, “I don’t eat eggs, ever.” Or, “Liver? Gross!” However, when adults do it they better have a severe allergy or a convincing health, political, or environmental argument to back it up. Not liking a food, no matter how it’s prepared, makes you seem like an unworldly country bumpkin. On a first date, it tells your companion that you’re unadventurous and unhealthy because your diet rarely strays far from the beaten path.

Most of us developed these food phobias during childhood, but it’s never too late to get over them. In fact, foods many people hated as children not only provide essential nutrients for adult bodies but they house a potpourri of savors, tangs, and zests. Here are the most common “ick” foods that are actually incredibly good for you—and tasty.

1. BRUSSELS SPROUTS
It’s easy to hate these mini-cabbages without even trying them. They’re the knee-jerk low-water mark for kids. The bitter taste, odd texture, and vague aroma of feet are enough to scare anyone off. However, the same qualities are attributed to fine cheeses.

Health benefits
Very high in fiber and protein, it can be a filling but low-calorie side dish. Scientists also believe the vegetable may protect against cancer because it’s rich in indole—a phytochemical—and vitamin C.

Learn to like it
Buy fresh Brussels sprouts that are still on the stalk. These will taste much better than the frozen. Slice each one down the middle and cook them in extra-virgin olive oil with freshly chopped garlic on the stove. Salt and pepper to your taste. To “gourmet-it-up,” add walnuts, shallots, grated cheese, and bacon in moderation.

2. BROCCOLI
These “mini-trees” pack a healthy dose of vitamin K that you typically find in leafy green vegetables. No wonder children view florets with contempt; they represent the antithesis of Snickers bars. However, broccoli can be a man’s best friend. Simple to prepare, it’s a filling side-dish or quick raw snack.

Health benefits
Vitamins C, K, and A are all represented in spades in broccoli. As well as being high in fiber, it has multiple anti-cancer nutrients such as diindolylmethane and selenium. The diindolylmethane is also known to fight other viruses and bacteria. In studies, men who eat a lot of broccoli generally reduce their risk of aggressive prostate cancer and heart disease.

Learn to like it
There’s no need to avoid broccoli on the appetizer tray, just dip it in hummus or add a dab of ranch dressing. You can also crumble some florets on your salad; they will make it more filling. Steam or bake them with olive oil for a quick side dish. If you decide to go more extreme, cover a casserole dish with florets. Pour three tablespoons of melted butter over it and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle cheddar cheese on top and bake for 10 – 15 minutes.

3. FISH
Children find everything wrong with seafood: fishy smell and taste, texture, bone paranoia, etc. However, as an adult, not enjoying the sea’s bounty limits you from multiple ethnic cuisines. Not only that, it is the perfect protein source to help you lose weight and cut down on meat with saturated fat.

Health benefits
The American Heart Association recommends men eat fish twice a week to get enough omega-3, the fatty acids that reduce the risk of heart disease and the most common type of stroke. Some research even suggests omega-3s increase brain and visual functions and fight everything from asthma to depression. Eating fish instead of other meats can also reduce your cholesterol.

Learn to like it
Not all fish has that fishy-taste. Try halibut, tilapia, mahi-mahi, or throw a tuna steak on the grill instead of a burger. Stuffed flounder will taste like whatever you stuff it with. You can even start with something as small as a couple anchovies in your Caesar’s salad. And there’s the whole world of shellfish and mollusks too. Buy some tempura batter mix and it’s easy to make lightly breaded fish that go great with potatoes or in tacos.

4. TURNIPS
Whoever ever figured out that turnips could be eaten must have been really hungry. They don’t look the least bit appetizing. A bulbous purple root, most men wouldn’t pick one up in the grocery store and think, “Let’s have a go at this.” You wouldn’t even know where to start.

Health benefits
Turnips are a strong source of vitamin C, fiber, folic acid, manganese, pantothenic acid, and copper; plus they contain thiamine, potassium, niacin, and magnesium. They’re starchy like potatoes, but with one-third the calories.

Learn to like it
Substitute turnips where you usually make potatoes. Not only will this diversify your at-home menu, it will cut down on caloric intake. You can bake, mash, and cut them into French fries. They can also be served raw on a veggie tray.

5. BEETS
Many men pass over beets on the salad bar without ever trying them. It can be hard to know what to make of them. They look like slices of canned cranberry jelly. However, their sweet taste jazzes up a salad. Canned beets even make a cheap, quick, healthy snack by themselves.

Health benefits
High in carbohydrates, they’re a quick energy source without the crash you get from processed carbs. Beets are good source of magnesium, calcium, iron, and niacin, as well as vitamins A and C. Studies also show they reduce the risk of colon cancer.

Learn to like them
Throwing a couple on a salad is an easy way to get used to the odd-looking vegetable. When you’re ready to dive in, make a beet salad. There are a variety of recipes that are tasty and will impress a female dinner guest. A great southern favorite is roasted beet salad with bacon.

6. LIVER
Just the thought of eating this internal organ will make some people gag. However, eating liver dates back centuries. Certain prehistoric tribes regarded it as the delicacy from the hunt. Medieval Europeans turned liver into everything from pastries to sausages. Get in touch with your primal man—eat liver.

Health benefits
Obviously it is a good source of protein, but it is also nature’s most concentrated source of vitamin A. Patients with iron-deficiencies eat it due to its highly usable form of iron and all of the B vitamins. Many also claim it fights fatigue.

Learn to like it
Preparing liver doesn’t have to be a big event. The next time you crave a barbecued steak, substitute thinly sliced beef liver. Fry it in a pan with onions and your favorite barbecue sauce or right on the grill.

7. SPINACH
Popeye made spinach look great when he used it to beat up Bluto. However, when you popped a can and dug in, it tasted like soggy metal. While these green leaves use to primarily appear in cartoons, now they appear on most menus across the country. So ditch the can and prepare a dish that does the leafy vegetable justice.

Health benefits
Like the other vegetables profiled already, spinach’s A and C vitamins, fiber, folic acid, magnesium and other nutrients help prevent cancer, especially colon, lung, and breast cancers, and heart disease. Also the flavonoids in it reduce against age-related memory loss. But a big one in spinach is lutein, which prevents cataracts and macular degeneration.

Learn to like it
The great thing about spinach is its versatility. Throw it in omelets with cheese, turkey, or ham. Pour warm bacon vinaigrette over a bed of spinach and chopped purple onions (a little bit of bacon seems to help mask all healthy foods). Even toss raw spinach with melted margarine and heat in the microwave for a quick side dish. Want to keep it extra simple? Chop up strawberries and walnuts and sprinkle them over a bed of fresh spinach for a delicious salad.

8. AVOCADO
For those who didn’t grow up in the Southwest or California, you may find this creamy green fruit bit odd odd. However, avocados yield the culinary wonder known as guacamole, something no Mexican dish can be without.

Health benefits
Dubbed the world’s healthiest fruit for its source of vitamin K, dietary fiber, potassium, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin C, copper, and oleic acid, a medium avocado can have 27 grams of fat. However, its monounsaturated fat helps lower cholesterol and its folate aids heart health.

Learn to like it
If guacamole hasn’t already turned you on to avocados, add a wedge to a turkey sandwich instead of cheese. Or slice a little with black beans and rice for a hot lunch. The protein will satiate your hunger longer.

9. COTTAGE CHEESE
Curdled milk chunks? Well, when one puts it like that, it’s obvious why children aren’t clamoring for this filling snack. Men don’t usually like this dairy delight as much as women, but we should.

Health benefits
High in protein and low in carbohydrates, cottage cheese is a breakfast that will stay with you. Most of its protein is casein, a slow digesting form that reduces hunger for longer periods of time. It’s also high in calcium, which is important not only for bones but maintaining normal blood pressure.

Learn to like it
If eating cottage cheese with sliced fruit doesn’t intrigue you, try adding hot sauce and salt. It’s great sweet or savory. If you’re already a fan of guacamole, add a few spoons of cottage cheese to your mix. It will make it heartier and prevent it from turning brown.

10. EGGPLANT
If the eggplant were a superhero, it would be Batman. It’s dark, mysterious, and although it doesn’t have superpowers — it’s bold and rich on different levels. Children can’t get past its spongy texture, but adults should champion its ability to adapt differently to each dish.

Health benefits
It has much of the same laundry list of nutrients these other vegetables have offered including fiber, folate, niacin, etc. On top of that, eggplants are a great source of antioxidant called phytonutrients including the potent antioxidant called nasunin, which prevents the damage of cell membranes.

Learn to like it
Eggplant’s porous flesh soaks in whatever flavors surround it and adds its own, making complex tastes: Eggplant Parmesan, ratatouille, Arabian moussaka, and many Indian dishes. It’s a vegetarian’s favorite because it’s a great substitute for meat-based dishes. It can even be grilled like a burger. Each dish is completely different so keep trying.

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Sweeten the health care pot: Tax sugar

Rex Says: “A regular 20-ounce soda contains 17 teaspoons of sugar (almost 6 TABLESPOONS) and 250 calories. The avg. American drinks 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually.” This is info from a great article from Kelly D. Brownell, Director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University and David S. [...]

Rex Says: “A regular 20-ounce soda contains 17 teaspoons of sugar (almost 6 TABLESPOONS) and 250 calories. The avg. American drinks 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually.” This is info from a great article from Kelly D. Brownell, Director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University and David S. Ludwig, associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Most Americans do not understand the amount of refined sugars that they are consuming, and the devastation it has their health.

A nationwide surcharge on syrupy beverages would provide both revenues and health benefits.

By KELLY D. BROWNELL and DAVID S. LUDWIG

The United States needs a health care sweet spot — a way to raise revenue now and to lower health care costs in the future. Taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages — those with added sugar, high-fructose corn syrup or so-called fruit juice concentrates — would answer that need.

There are already minor surcharges on soda in many states — fractions of a cent per ounce in most cases. That’s not enough. What’s needed is a penny per ounce of sugary beverages. That amount would raise about $150 billion nationally over the next 10 years. At the same time, the reduced consumption of soft drinks produced by a penny-per-ounce national tax would have direct health benefits, estimated to be at least $50 billion over the decade. This $200 billion could make an enormous difference in addressing the nation’s mounting health care costs.

The average American drinks 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually. The marketplace, once dominated by a few flagship beverages such as Coke and Pepsi, has exploded into a wide array of fruit drinks, sweetened teas, energy drinks, sports drinks and other versions of sugar water. But two companies still reign: Together, Coca-Cola and PepsiCo control three-quarters of the world beverage market.

Sugared beverages are marketed with fierce precision, using sports stars and other celebrities and promising benefits ranging from increased energy to better memory. Product placements in television shows, such as Coca-Cola on “American Idol,” expose vast numbers of children to hidden marketing. Portions are also an issue — the 8-ounce bottle of the 1950s has morphed into a 20-ounce behemoth.

A regular 20-ounce soda contains 17 teaspoons of sugar and 250 calories.

For full article http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentary/63806572.html?page=2&c=y

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Study Reveals Coconut Oil Improves Cholesterol Profile and Waistline

Rex Says: In our journey into health, we switched to using organic coconut oil for any sauteeing we do. This article discusses the controversy around it, but Lisa’s and my labwork looks great so interesting info and how it’s supposed to ‘harm’ health.
Study Reveals Coconut Oil Improves Cholesterol Profile and Waistline
by Elizabeth Walling, citizen [...]

Rex Says: In our journey into health, we switched to using organic coconut oil for any sauteeing we do. This article discusses the controversy around it, but Lisa’s and my labwork looks great so interesting info and how it’s supposed to ‘harm’ health.

Study Reveals Coconut Oil Improves Cholesterol Profile and Waistline
by Elizabeth Walling, citizen journalist
See all articles by this author
Email this author

(NaturalNews) A recent study reveals new evidence that could turn the tide in the ongoing debate about which fats are the healthier choice: saturated fats like coconut oil or polyunsaturated fats like soybean oil. Many natural food experts will tell you without question that coconut oil is one of the healthiest fats, but since giants like the Food and Drug Administration and the American Diabetes Association maintain that saturated fats are bad, the public is tossed back and forth between two polar beliefs.

The study – which is yet to be published in print – included 40 women between the ages of 20 and 40 years old. All of the women were instructed to follow the same balanced, low-calorie diet while maintaining a moderate daily exercise routine over a 12-week period. Half of the women were given a 30 ml supplement of coconut oil each day, while the other half was given 30 ml of soybean oil. Over the course of the study, overall carbohydrate and caloric intake decreased. Fat, protein and fiber intake remained unchanged during the study.

One week before the study and one week after, the women were evaluated on a number of factors: waist circumference, lipid levels, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol were all noted, as well as the HDL:LDL ratio. At the beginning of the study there was no significant difference in these factors in either group of women.

At the end of the study, both groups showed a decrease in body mass index (BMI), but only the women taking coconut oil showed a notable decrease in waist circumference as well. Evidence shows that a decrease in waist circumference can significantly lower one’s risk for conditions like type II diabetes and heart disease.

The study also showed that the women taking coconut oil had an improved cholesterol profile, with higher HDL levels and a higher HDL:LDL ratio. Those taking soybean oil, however, did not receive the same benefits. In fact, the soybean oil group had higher total cholesterol, higher LDL cholesterol, lower HDL cholesterol, and a lower HDL:LDL ratio.

In the words of the study authors: “It appears that dietetic supplementation with coconut oil does not cause dyslipidemia and seems to promote a reduction in abdominal obesity.”

In layman’s terms, results like this completely contradict what the FDA and other major associations have been spoon-feeding the public for decades while the rate of disease and obesity climb at alarming rates. Maybe it’s time to rethink our conventional theories about fats.

For More Information:

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/con…

http://www.foryourhealth.eu/content…

Assuncao ML, Ferreira HS, Dos Santos AF, Cabral CR Jr, Florencio TM. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil on the Biochemical and Anthropometric Profiles of Women Presenting Abdominal Obesity. Lipids. May 13, 2009. [Published Online Ahead of Print Publication.

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Quinoa Affords Many Benefits

Lisa Says: Kee-what?? (Keen-wah) That’s what we said too, and it’s become one of our FAVORITES. We use it just like rice (and prepare it the same way other than initially rinsing) but it’s powerpacked nutritionally. We add a little organic chicken broth while cooking and it’s just GREAT. PROMISE [...]

Lisa Says: Kee-what?? (Keen-wah) That’s what we said too, and it’s become one of our FAVORITES. We use it just like rice (and prepare it the same way other than initially rinsing) but it’s powerpacked nutritionally. We add a little organic chicken broth while cooking and it’s just GREAT. PROMISE on this one.

Quinoa Affords Many Benefits
by Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) Vegetarians and vegans often find it difficult getting enough protein in to their diets. They are usually stuck eating beans and soy products most of which do not actually contain all the necessary amino acids, or what is known as complete protein. A diet lacking in protein can cause many health problems ranging from lethargy and irritability to serious skin conditions, wasting muscles and a weakened immune system. This makes it essential for none meat eaters to get as much protein into their body as possible. The answer to this problem could come from a long forgotten South America Grain called Quinoa. Quinoa grain was once called “The gold of the Incas” and “The mother of all grains” and is known for its high protein content that contains all the amino acids essential for our wellbeing. The name Quinoa grain is in fact very misleading. Quinoa is actually the seed from a plant that is closely related to leafy green vegetables such as spinach and beets. It has recently become very popular because of its distinctive nutty taste, amazing versatility and incredibly high mineral content.

Quinoa and Magnesium

The benefits of Quinoa actually go far beyond that of a protein substitute for vegans and vegetarians. People who suffer from migraines wouldn’t go far wrong in making Quinoa a regular part of their diet. This is because Quinoa also contains high amounts of magnesium. People who suffer from persistent migraines often have problems sleeping at night, which may be due to a lack of Magnesium in their diets. A Magnesium deficiency can change electrical patterns in the brain causing restless sleep as well as frequent awaking. “It looks like magnesium is important for a good night’s sleep,” says researcher Forrest H. Nielsen. Magnesium is also an important mineral for relaxing the blood vessels, which can in turn lower blood pressure and cholesterol. It can also help in the battle against diabetes and is important for maintaining strong, healthy bones.

Quinoa and Iron

Iron is one of those minerals that we all know we need, but many of us are not sure exactly why we need it or how to get it. Iron actually plays an essential role in our body by helping to carry oxygen to our heart, lungs and brain. In doing so it keeps our minds alert and our bodies energized. Without enough iron, oxygen distribution in our body slows down and we may begin to get regular headaches, feel sluggish and become easily annoyed. A severe iron deficiency can lead to Anemia, which in certain situations can be life threatening. Around 65 % of Americans actually suffer from iron deficiency and are totally unaware of the fact. This could be cured by using Quinoa instead of rice in a risotto, as just a quarter of a cup contains around 20% of your recommended daily iron intake. This means that if everyone were to eat 3 or 4 cups of the grain a week many Americans would become more vibrant and energetic, which could in turn ease the obesity epidemic. No wonder Quinoa is now listed as one of the top ten super foods.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinoa

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Setting Up the Ideal Pantry for the Mediterranean Diet

Rex Says: Helpful hints similar to what we did to make lifestyle changes after I decided to treat my cancer naturally. AS EVER, please let us know if you’d like some help on developing an individual plan @ hungerforhealth@verizon.net. Remember, You’re not in this alone.
“Setting Up the Ideal Pantry” excerpted from What [...]

Rex Says: Helpful hints similar to what we did to make lifestyle changes after I decided to treat my cancer naturally. AS EVER, please let us know if you’d like some help on developing an individual plan @ hungerforhealth@verizon.net. Remember, You’re not in this alone.

“Setting Up the Ideal Pantry” excerpted from What Would Jesus Eat by Dr. Don Colbert.

The ideal pantry for eating the way Jesus ate would include these general good items:

BREAD: Select whole-grain breads or whole-grain pita bread. If you are allergic to wheat, choose millet bread or brown rice bread (available at most health food stores)
CEREAL: Choose GoLean soy cereal, all Bran, Fiber One, Shredded Wheat, Grape Nuts, Natural Granola (without added sugar), old-fashioned oatmeal (not instant), or Oat Bran. If you are allergic to wheat, try millet cereal or any gluten-free whole-grain cereal.
CHEESE: Choose parmesan (freshly grated or in a block you can grate yourself), part skim mozzarella, or feta cheese. If you are sensitive or allergic to dairy products, choose soy cheese. I recommend organic cheeses.
EGGS. Choose free-range eggs
FISH. Choose fish with scales and fins. Avoid catfish and shellfish. Make sure that your fish is fresh and that is comes form unpolluted waters.
FRUIT. Fresh is best. Frozen is acceptable. Avoid canned fruit packed in syrup.
HERBS AND SPICES. Many Mediterranean recipes call for garlic powder, parsley, Celtic Salt (available at most health food stores) and black powder. Experiment with herbs and spices – they are a great way to add flavor to your cooking without adding fat or sugar.
MEAT. Choose free-range meat. Avoid pork.
MILK. Choose skim milk and skim milk yogurt or cottage cheese. Soy milk, rice milk, and almond milk are good choices if a person is sensitive or allergic to dairy products.
NUTS.. Almonds and walnuts are preferred nuts. Keep nuts sealed in the bags after they are opened, and tore them in your refrigerator or freezer.
OLIVE OIL. Choose extra virgin or virgin olive oil
PASTA. Choose whole-grain pasta products. If you are allergic to wheat, try spelt or rice pasta.
POULTRY. Choose chicken and turkey, preferably white-meat portions.
SOUPS AND BROTHS. Choose low-sodium, low-fat, natural soup broths (available at health food stores) that are low in food additives.
STARCHES. Other than pasta, choose brown rice or wild rice, beans, legumes, lentils, coarse cornmeal or polenta, and potatoes (fresh, never instant)
SWEETS. Stock a little honey. Consider using Stevia (a natural food source that is very sweet an can be readily add to foods instead of artificial sweetener). It is good for diabetics and has no harmful side effects. You may also want to have a little naturally sweetened fruit spread (no sugar added)
VEGETABLES. Choose fresh or frozen. Low-sodium canned vegetables are acceptable on occasion. Choose especially from these vegetables: asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, peppers, olives, onions, spinach, tomatoes,
Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, collard greens, kale squash, turnip greens, and zucchini. Choose dark green lettuce such as romaine lettuce over iceburg lettuce, which does not have nearly as many phytonutrients.
VINEGAR. Choose balsamic, red wine, or apple cider.
WINE. Choose red.
YOGURT. Choose plain, skim or low fat
Remember always – what you bring home from the store is what you have available to eat. If you don’t bring junk food home, you won’t eat junk food at home

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Making The Change to a Mediterranean Healthstyle

Lisa Says: This was very much a part of our lifestyle change after Rex was diagnosed. It’s intimidating at first so starting with one or two things at a time is PERFECTLY OK. At least start getting the chemical cuisine out of what you eat – there are many natural alternatives for [...]

Lisa Says: This was very much a part of our lifestyle change after Rex was diagnosed. It’s intimidating at first so starting with one or two things at a time is PERFECTLY OK. At least start getting the chemical cuisine out of what you eat – there are many natural alternatives for snacks but BEWARE and READ THE LABEL. See our post on “Top 10 food additives and what they do to your body”.

“Making The Change to a Mediterranean Healthstyle” excerpted from What Would Jesus Eat by Dr. Don Colbert

1. Eliminate all processed foods from your cupboards, and start over. Toss all potato chips, corn chips and other snack foods with hydrogenated fat, cookies, cakes, candies, crackers, high-sugar cereals, white bread, highly processed foods, and high-sugar foods.
Also toss all oils other than olive oil, including any salad dressings, lard, Crisco, and other products that have hydrogenated fat.
Begin to buy only whole-grain food items and fresh fruits and vegetables.
Stock your shelves with olive oil, nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

2. Cook and bake with whole-grain products. Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, beans, legumes, and nuts.

3. Substitute olive oil for butter, margarine, salad dressings and other oils. Avoid all fried or deep-fried foods.

4. Limit cheese intake to small amounts of parmesan or feta cheese (used on main dishes or salads). Do not eat block cheese.

5. Eat low fat, plain yogurt, add fruit, and sweeten with Stevia (a natural substitute for sugar that has no harmful side effects).

6. Choose fish and poultry over red meat, and eat meat sparingly.

7. Cut out sugary sweets.

8. Enjoy a glass of red wine with lunch or dinner.

9. Exercise regularly – walk more.

10 Make dining an experience that you enjoy with others. Slow down your eating, savor your food, and enjoy sharing life with family and friends.

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Maintain Healthy Bacteria Levels Essential for Optimum Health

Rex Says: I’ve learned on my health journey that all roads to health start with the intestinal system, even my cancer healing.
Maintain Healthy Bacteria Levels Essential for Optimum Health
by Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist
(NaturalNews) A balanced digestive tract is essential for optimum health and is responsible for 80 percent of the immune system. When there is [...]

Rex Says: I’ve learned on my health journey that all roads to health start with the intestinal system, even my cancer healing.

Maintain Healthy Bacteria Levels Essential for Optimum Health
by Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) A balanced digestive tract is essential for optimum health and is responsible for 80 percent of the immune system. When there is not enough good bacteria in the body, unhealthy bacteria begin to proliferate, causing ill health and disease.

The body is loaded with both good and bad bacteria. There are approximately 100 trillion bacteria living inside each human. Ideally, the body should have at least 85% good bacteria for optimal health. This includes:

*A highly efficient immune system
*Protection against over-growth of other microorganisms such as Candida (fungi), parasites and bacteria that cause illness.
*Proper digestion of food
*Absorption of nutrients
*Production of vitamins
*Elimination of toxins.
*Prevention from allergies, since good bacteria allow the body to distinguish between harmful substances and healthy ones.

Good Bacteria and Weight Loss

An imbalance in digestive bacteria can cause weight problems. Because an abundance of good bacterium ensures digestion and absorption, a lack of good bacteria can lead to an increase in toxic fat and obesity.

Many studies have revealed that people who are obese have imbalanced intestinal bacteria, while people who enjoy healthy weight levels tend to have healthy gut bacteria.

How to get Good Bacteria into the Body

The most ancient way of replenishing good bacteria in the body is through fermented foods. Fermented foods have been eaten in most cultures. Yogurt, sauerkraut, miso, kimchi (fermented cabbage) and kefir are all traditional foods that are naturally dense in healthy bacteria.

A diet rich in these fermented foods is a great way to get good bacteria into the system. The key is to ensure that these foods have not been pasteurized, as the process of pasteurization kills off the good beneficial goodness.

In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of good bacteria products on the market. Besides avoiding foods that have been pasteurized, choose foods which list a specific strain of bacteria on their label, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The last two letters show what strain of bacteria the product contains, meaning that it has been scientifically proven to be good for the body,
It is also important that the product says “LIVE” on the package. It may contain good bacteria, but if the good bacteria are not alive, they are not beneficial. It is also necessary that the product is not out of date, as this can mean that the good bacteria are no longer living.

Taking a good quality supplement is another good way to ensure that your body abounds in friendly bacteria. Ask around and find the product that is most beneficial. Talk to specialists and people who are into nutrition. Not all probiotics are equal, so it is essential to find one that is live and powerful.

How to Avoid Killing off Good Bacteria

While it is important to replenish the body with good bacteria, it is equally, if not more important to prevent killing off good bacteria.

A diet high in processed foods and chemicals is likely to lead to an overgrowth in unfriendly bacteria. Relying on cooked foods as opposed to eating a diet high in living raw foods is also likely to yield a bacterial imbalance. Sugar is one of the worst foods for it fertilizes bad bacteria in the gut.

Perhaps one of the greatest threats to a balanced digestive tract is antibiotics. Antibiotics kill off all bacteria, which is why they have been used to treat illnesses. Unfortunately, antibiotics not only kill off the tiny unwanted bacteria in one part of the body that is causing an infection, they kill off the good bacteria throughout the body. This allows unhealthy bacteria to quickly proliferate, causing disease and ill health. The overuse of antibiotics, along with unnatural food, is one of the greatest causes of modern day illness.

The birth control pill and steroids have also been shown to create an imbalance in the healthy bacterial flora in the body, along with general stress and pollution.

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Water or coke?

Water or Coke?

WATER
#1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.
(Likely applies to half the world population)
#2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak
that it is mistaken for hunger.
#3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as much as 3%.
#4. One glass of water will shut [...]

Water or Coke?


WATER

#1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.
(Likely applies to half the world population)

#2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak
that it is mistaken for hunger.

#3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as much as 3%.

#4. One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs
for almost 100% of the dieters studied in a University of
Washington study.

#5. Lack of water, the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

#6. Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of
water a day could significantly ease back and joint pain
for up to 80% of sufferers.

#7. A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term
memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on
the computer screen or on a printed page.

#8. Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of
colon cancer by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast
cancer by 79%., and one is 50% less likely to develop
bladder cancer. Are you drinking the amount of water
you should drink every day?

COKE

#1. In many states the highway patrol carries
two gallons of Coke in the trunk to remove blood from
the highway after a car accident.

#2. You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of Coke
and it will be gone in two days.

#3. To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the
toilet bowl and let the “real thing” sit for one hour,
then flush clean. The citric acid in Coke removes
stains from vitreous China .

#4. To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers:
Rub the bumper with a rumpled-up piece of Reynolds
Wrap aluminum foil dipped in Coca-Cola.

#5. To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour
a can of Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble
away the corrosion.

#6. To loosen a rusted bolt: Apply a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola
to the rusted bolt for several minutes.

#7. To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into
the baking pan, wrap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake.
Thirty minutes before ham is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix
with the Coke for a sumptuous brown gravy.

#8… To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of Coke
into the load of greasy clothes, add detergent, and run
through a regular cycle. The Coca-Cola will help loosen
grease stains. It will also clean road haze from your
windshield.

FOR YOUR INFORMATION:

#1. the active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid.
It will dissolve a nail in about four days. Phosphoric
acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major
contributor to the rising increase of osteoporosis.

#2. To carry Coca-Cola syrup! (the concentrate) the
commercial trucks must use a hazardous Material place
cards reserved for highly corrosive materials.

#3. The distributors of Coke have been using it to clean
engines of the trucks for about 20 years!

Now the question is, would you like a glass of water?

or Coke?


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